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dc.contributor.advisorRocco, Providenza Loera
dc.creatorChavarria, Brijae Anne
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T16:23:34Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T16:23:34Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2684
dc.description.abstractDeath is an inevitable part of life, yet many Americans fail to plan for this final part of life. Only about 1/3 of our country has an advance directive (Off White Papers, 2014). This underutilization of advance directives is reflected in our health care spending. It is estimated that 30% of all Medicare spending occurs during the last six months of a patient’s life. The numbers are even lower when broken down into sub-categories. Only 24% of older Black Americans possess an advance directive versus 44% of their older White counterparts (Huang, Neuhaus, & Chiong, 2016). Some studies found that African Americans were more likely to “express discomfort discussing death, want aggressive care at the end of life, have spiritual beliefs which conflict with the goals of palliative care, and distrust the healthcare system” (Johnson, Kuchibhatla, & Tulsky, 2008). Other studies have even concluded that Black race is an independent predictor of lack of advance directive possession (Huang et al., 2016). This paper further explores the possibility that race and ethnicity may simply be proxies for cultural values that impact advance directive possession. We’ll discuss the barriers, for both Black patients and health care providers, to advance directive possession as well as investigate culturally mindful interventions to combat the barriers.
dc.format.extent39 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMedical Ethics
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectGerontology
dc.subjectAdvance Directives
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectCultural Competency
dc.subjectEnd of Life Planning
dc.subjectPractical Bioethics
dc.titleTHE PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO HEALTH CARE ADVANCE DIRECTIVE POSSESSION IN THE BLACK AMERICAN COMMUNITY—SHOULD WE ADDRESS IT AS A RACIAL DISPARITY OR A CULTURAL DIFFERENCE?
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.description.departmentUrban Bioethics
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2666
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-03T16:23:34Z


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