Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRavi, Sujith
dc.creatorBurger, William
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T16:23:29Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T16:23:29Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2646
dc.description.abstractMany grasslands in arid and semi-arid regions are undergoing rapid changes in vegetation, including encroachment of woody plants and invasive grasses, which can alter the rates and patterns of fire and sediment transport in these landscapes. We investigated the spatial distribution of sediments at the scale of vegetated microsites for three years following a prescribed fire using a multiple rare earth element (REE) tracer-based approach in a shrub-grass transition zone in the northern Chihuahuan desert (New Mexico, USA). To this end, we applied REE tracers – holmium, europium, and ytterbium on shrub, grass, and bare microsites, respectively in March 2016. Soil samples were collected from both burned and control (not burned) sites before (March) and after (June) the annual windy season, from 2016 through 2018. Results indicate that although the horizontal mass flux (HMF) of wind-borne sediment increased approximately threefold in the first windy season following the fire, and the HMF of both plots were not significantly different after three windy seasons. Comparing REE concentrations in sediments from both plots over the three years and three annual windy seasons, we observed a post-fire shift in source and sink dynamics of sediments. The tracer analysis of wind-borne sediments indicated that the source of the HMF in the burned site was mostly derived from shrub microsites following the fire, whereas the bare microsites were the major contributors for aeolian sediment in control areas. The shift in sources and sinks, and the spatial homogenization of REEs indicate that the removal of shrub vegetation resulted in sediment redistribution to the bare microsites even three years after the prescribed fire. The findings of this study will improve our understanding of post-fire geomorphic processes at a microsite scale in a grassland ecosystem undergoing land degradation induced by shrub encroachment.
dc.format.extent76 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectGeomorphology
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectEnvironmental Geology
dc.subjectChihuahuan Desert
dc.subjectDesertification
dc.subjectFeedbacks
dc.subjectLand Degradation
dc.subjectRare Earth Elements
dc.subjectShrub Encroachment
dc.titleSpatial Analysis of Post-Fire Sediment Redistribution Using Rare Earth Element Tracers
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGrandstaff, David E.
dc.contributor.committeememberBuynevich, Ilya V.
dc.description.departmentGeology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2628
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.S.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-03T16:23:29Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXBurger-temple-0225M-136 ...
Size:
2.959Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record