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dc.creatorPollock, David D.
dc.creatorCastoe, Todd A.
dc.creatorPerry, Blair W.
dc.creatorLytras, Spyros
dc.creatorWade, Kristen J.
dc.creatorRobertson, David L.
dc.creatorHolmes, Edward C.
dc.creatorBoni, Maciej F.
dc.creatorPond, Sergei
dc.creatorParry, Rhys
dc.creatorCarlton, Elizabeth J.
dc.creatorWood, James L. N.
dc.creatorPennings, Pleuni S.
dc.creatorGoldstein, Richard A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-24T17:47:44Z
dc.date.available2020-08-24T17:47:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-13
dc.identifier.citationDavid D Pollock, Todd A Castoe, Blair W Perry, Spyros Lytras, Kristen J Wade, David L Robertson, Edward C Holmes, Maciej F Boni, Sergei L Kosakovsky Pond, Rhys Parry, Elizabeth J Carlton, James L N Wood, Pleuni S Pennings, Richard A Goldstein, Viral CpG deficiency provides no evidence that dogs were intermediate hosts for SARS-CoV-2, Molecular Biology and Evolution, , msaa178, https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msaa178
dc.identifier.issn1537-1719
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/239
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/255
dc.description.abstractDue to the scope and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic there exists a strong desire to understand where the SARS-CoV-2 virus came from and how it jumped species boundaries to humans. Molecular evolutionary analyses can trace viral origins by establishing relatedness and divergence times of viruses and identifying past selective pressures. However, we must uphold rigorous standards of inference and interpretation on this topic because of the ramifications of being wrong. Here, we dispute the conclusions of Xia (2020) that dogs are a likely intermediate host of a SARS-CoV-2 ancestor. We highlight major flaws in Xia’s inference process and his analysis of CpG deficiencies, and conclude that there is no direct evidence for the role of dogs as intermediate hosts. Bats and pangolins currently have the greatest support as ancestral hosts of SARS-CoV-2, with the strong caveat that sampling of wildlife species for coronaviruses has been limited.
dc.format.extent14 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCOVID-19 Research
dc.relation.haspartMolecular Biology and Evolution
dc.relation.isreferencedbyOxford University Press
dc.relation.isreferencedbyThis article has been accepted for publication in Molecular Biology and Evolution Published by Oxford University Press
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectCoronavirus infections
dc.titleViral CpG deficiency provides no evidence that dogs were intermediate hosts for SARS-CoV-2
dc.typeText
dc.type.genrePost-print
dc.contributor.groupInstitute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (Temple University)
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msaa178
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Science and Technology
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-4817-4029
dc.temple.creatorPond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-24T17:47:45Z


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