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dc.creatorSwiecki-Sikora, Allison L.
dc.creatorStroup, Antoinette M.
dc.creatorWarner, Echo L.
dc.creatorKepka, Deanna
dc.creatorHenry, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-20T13:12:01Z
dc.date.available2020-04-20T13:12:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-14
dc.identifier.citationHenry, K. A., Swiecki-Sikora, A. L., Stroup, A. M., Warner, E. L., Kepka, D., (2017) Area-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States. BMC Public Health 18: 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4567-2.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/24
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study is the first to examine associations between several area-based socioeconomic factors and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among boys in the United States (U.S.). Methods: Data from the 2012-2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen restricted-use data were analyzed to examine associations of HPV vaccination initiation (receipt of ≥1 dose) and series completion (receipt of three doses) among boys aged 13-17 years (N = 19,518) with several individual-level and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) census measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of HPV vaccination initiation and series completion separately. Results: In 2012-2013 approximately 27.9% (95% CI 26.6%-29.2%) of boys initiated and 10.38% (95% CI 9.48%-11.29%) completed the HPV vaccine series. Area-based poverty was not statistically significantly associated with HPV vaccination initiation. It was, however, associated with series completion, with boys living in high-poverty areas (≥20% of residents living below poverty) having higher odds of completing the series (AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48) than boys in low-poverty areas (0-4.99%). Interactions between race/ethnicity and ZIP code-level poverty indicated that Hispanic boys living in high-poverty areas had a statistically significantly higher odds of HPV vaccine initiation (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and series completion (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.32) than Hispanic boys in low-poverty areas. Non-Hispanic Black boys in high poverty areas had higher odds of initiation (AOR 2.23, 95% CI 1.33-3.75) and completion (AOR 2.61, 95% CI 1.06-6.44) than non-Hispanic Black boys in low-poverty areas. Rural/urban residence and population density were also significant factors, with boys from urban or densely populated areas having higher odds of initiation and completion compared to boys living in non-urban, less densely populated areas. Conclusion: Higher HPV vaccination coverage in urban areas and among racial/ethnic minorities in areas with high poverty may be attributable to factors such as vaccine acceptance, health-care practices, and their access to HPV vaccines through the Vaccines for Children Program, which provides free vaccines to uninsured and under-insured children. Given the low HPV vaccination rates among boys in the U.S., these results provide important evidence to inform public health interventions to increase HPV vaccination.
dc.format.extent16 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofOpen Access Publishing Fund (OAPF)
dc.relation.haspartBMC Public Health, Vol. 18, Article number 19
dc.relation.isreferencedbyBioMed Central
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectHuman papillomavirus
dc.subjectHPV vaccination
dc.subjectGeographic factors
dc.subjectCervical cancer
dc.subjectCancer prevention
dc.subjectHealth disparities
dc.titleArea-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.description.departmentGeography and Urban Studies
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4567-2
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Liberal Arts
dc.description.sponsorTemple University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund, 2016-2017 (Philadelphia, Pa.)
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-5348-9669
dc.temple.creatorHenry, Kevin A.
dc.temple.creatorSwiecki-Sikora, Allison L.
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-20T13:12:01Z


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