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dc.contributor.advisorJacobson, Thomas L.
dc.contributor.advisorDarling-Wolf, Fabienne
dc.creatorSuh, HaeLim
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T15:33:53Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T15:33:53Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2478
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation illustrates the cultural dimension of globalization by examining how the ascendance of South Korean popular culture, i.e., the Korean Wave, reshapes the global imagination and transforms the locality of Korean Americans in Philadelphia. As an ethnographic global media study, I conducted in-depth interviews and participated in Korean cultural events/meetings, as well as visited the sites of living for Korean Americans in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. My research finds that advances in the digitalized media environment made my informants consume copious transnational Korean media every day and individualized their media consumption. Accordingly, their perceptions of Korea/Asia/U.S.’s places in the world are complicated and their ethnic identity has become significant. Their global imaginations also intersect with negotiating gender roles, perceiving attractiveness, and planning future paths. This shift contributes to construction of the in-between identities of Korean Americans by denaturalizing ideas and cultural elements in both Korea and the U.S. Most distinctively, the rise of the Korean Wave stimulates global imagination among young second generation Korean Americans to aspire to and operate their agency in a transnational context that their parents’ generation barely anticipated. Finally, the upsurge of the Korean Wave drives Korean Americans to participate in transforming localities rooted in thickened connectivities and activities centering on Korean popular culture across intra/inter-ethnic groups locally and globally. This conversely facilitates intense engagement and belonging in the local spaces of community among Korean Americans. My study shows how transnational media flow under conditions of globalization positively influences immigrants to embrace their own ethnic identities and local spaces. On the other hand, it implies that there should be further examination of different boundaries of global imagination rooted in gender/class differences as well as race/ethnicity.
dc.format.extent345 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMass Communication
dc.subjectAsian American Studies
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural
dc.subjectEthnic Identity
dc.subjectGender Identity
dc.subjectGlobal Imagination
dc.subjectKorean American
dc.subjectKorean Wave (hallyu)
dc.subjectProduction of Locality
dc.titleThe rise of the Korean Wave in the United States: Global imagination and the production of locality among Korean Americans in Philadelphia
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberMurphy, Patrick
dc.contributor.committeememberPark, DongSook
dc.description.departmentMedia & Communication
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2460
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-03T15:33:53Z


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