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dc.contributor.advisorImmerman, Richard H.
dc.creatorShannon, Kelly J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T15:11:01Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T15:11:01Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.other864884905
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2354
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the ways in which Americans constructed a public understanding about gender relations in Muslim countries from the Iranian Revolution through the post-9/11 period that cast Muslims as oppressors of women. It argues that such understandings significantly influenced U.S. foreign policy in recent decades. In the last quarter of the twentieth century, the degree to which women had or lacked rights became one barometer by which Americans judged Muslim societies. Journalists, scholars, women's rights activists, novelists, filmmakers, politicians, and others in the U.S. contributed to public debates since 1979 that cast Muslims as particularly oppressive of women. The pervasiveness of such views and lobbying efforts by women's rights activists pushed policymakers to situate the attainment of rights for women within the constellation of legitimate areas of policy concern regarding the Muslim world. As a consequence, by the 1990s concern for Muslim women's rights sometimes drove U.S. policy, as when President Clinton chose not to recognize the Taliban regime in 1998; at other times, rhetoric about the oppression of Muslim women became a political tool which policymakers could use to provide legitimacy and moral force for their interventions in the Islamic world. This story is both national and transnational and involves both state and non-state actors.
dc.format.extent313 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHistory, United States
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.subjectIslamic Studies
dc.subjectGulf War
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectMuslim Women
dc.subjectSisterhood Is Global Institute
dc.subjectTaliban
dc.subjectU.S. Foreign Policy
dc.titleVeiled Intentions: Islam, Global Feminism, and U.S. Foreign Policy Since the Late 1970s
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Beth L.
dc.contributor.committeememberFarber, David R.
dc.contributor.committeememberGoedde, Petra
dc.contributor.committeememberKashani-Sabet, Firoozeh
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2336
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T15:11:02Z


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