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dc.contributor.advisorEllman, Lauren M.
dc.contributor.advisorFauber, Robert
dc.creatorSandt, Arthur Ralph
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T15:10:55Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T15:10:55Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other864885435
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2306
dc.description.abstractSchizophrenia is a debilitating disorder with an array of affective, cognitive, and behavioral consequences. In addition to these impairments, research suggests that there is a distinct pattern of hedonic functioning in schizophrenia that may contribute to some of the most intractable symptoms of the disorder, the negative symptoms. Specifically, individuals with schizophrenia appear to experience deficient levels of pleasure during anticipation of a pleasurable stimulus, while experiencing typical levels of pleasure while directly engaged with a pleasurable stimulus. Despite these findings, it is unclear whether hedonic functioning deficits occur in individuals with subthreshold levels of psychotic symptoms and/or in individuals at clinical high risk for the disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine hedonic functioning in relation to the continuum of psychotic symptoms in a college undergraduate student sample, and in those at clinical risk for schizophrenia. Participants were 679 students who completed self-report measures of current psychotic-like experiences, and trait-like components of hedonic functioning (i.e., anticipatory and consummatory pleasure). Consistent with study hypotheses, deficits in anticipatory pleasure, but not in consummatory pleasure, were significantly associated with increased clinical risk for schizophrenia. However, this relation was found exclusively among women in the sample, whereas men did not show a significant relation between anticipatory pleasure deficits and clinical high-risk. Furthermore, anticipatory pleasure deficits were not significantly associated with increases in the number of positive psychotic symptoms endorsed. Moreover, consummatory pleasure was not associated with increases in the number of subthreshold positive psychotic symptoms, nor was there a relation with the number of distressing positive psychotic symptoms or clinical risk status. The present study provides the first examination of the relation between hedonic functioning and subthreshold psychotic symptoms, as well as the relation with clinical high-risk for psychosis. These findings suggest that anticipatory pleasure deficits may be more closely related to increased clinical risk for psychosis among women rather than increases in psychotic symptoms in the general population. Anticipatory pleasure deficits may be a useful target for intervention and prevention techniques among those at clinical risk for psychosis, especially in female at risk populations. Additional longitudinal studies will be essential for testing whether anticipatory pleasure deficits predict the occurrence of future psychotic disorders among those at high risk for the disorder in order to improve early identification and early intervention efforts in this population.
dc.format.extent75 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAnhedonia
dc.subjectGeneral Population
dc.subjectHedonic Experience
dc.subjectProdrome
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectSubtreshold
dc.titleHedonic Functioning and Subthreshold Psychotic Symptoms
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Kareem
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2288
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T15:10:55Z


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