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dc.contributor.advisorDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.creatorRussotto, Darcy Anne
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T15:10:52Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T15:10:52Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.other864884494
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2286
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to provide insight on whether providing a single sex educational environment to inner-city African-American students helped to improve students' achievement and school engagement. A purposive sample of all students in grades three through six enrolled in single sex classrooms in a public school in a large urban city was included in this research. Comparison groups were selected from a neighboring public schools, ensuring the most consistency across demographic variables. Students completed two surveys: the School Engagement Survey (Fitt & DuCette, 2001) and the Estes Attitude Scale - Revised (Estes, Estes, Richards & Roetiger, 1981). Also, achievement data for these students were collected via a state sponsored school district data warehousing system. Students were also asked to participate in same sex, same grade focus groups. Ten teachers of these students were asked to participate in individual interviews. Results indicated that students in single-sex classes had statistically higher means than students in coeducational settings on the School Engagement Survey sections of Positive Self Perception, Positive Teacher Belief, and Positive School Environment. Also, students in coeducational settings had statistically higher means on the Estes Attitudes Scales for the subject of mathematics. Students who were enrolled in single-sex classes for more than one year had higher scores on standardized mathematics tests. Although single-sex and coeducational students start at approximately the same level for both reading and math, the single-sex students consistently score higher than their coeducational counterparts. Additionally, the results showed no significant gender differences on any of the measures of attitudes or achievement. Teachers did not drastically change their instructional approach after being assigned to a single-sex classroom but they did change their approach to behavior management. Teachers do not participate in quality, ongoing professional development to support their practice as teachers of a single-sex class. Both boys and girls seem to enjoy the attention they receive in single-sex classes. Boys and girls also expressed a feeling of comfort in the single-sex setting. Boys and girls alike expressed enjoyment of all school subjects including mathematics and science. Girls and younger boys perceived themselves as being much more academically successful in the single-sex classroom. Boys in grades five and six perceived themselves as failing academically and they blame the bad behavior exhibited in their all boys' classes.
dc.format.extent106 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology
dc.titleSingle-sex Education: Effects on Achievement and Engagement of African-American Students in Urban Public Schools
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberShapiro, Joan Poliner
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, James Earl
dc.contributor.committeememberFarley, Frank
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Marc Lamont
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2268
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T15:10:52Z


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