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dc.contributor.advisorSachs, Michael L.
dc.creatorRuggieri, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T15:10:51Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T15:10:51Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885311
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2280
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was two-fold: to quantitatively explore competitive rowers' perspectives of the benefits and barriers to exercise, and to use follow-up qualitative interviews to elicit insight into rowers' views of their sport culture, personal experience, and what it takes to be a dedicated, adherent athlete. A mixed-methods approach was used with online surveys and semi-structured interviews. Participants were club and university rowers in the Northeast Atlantic region, all of whom were at least 18 years of age and actively rowing at the time of study One hundred thirty-one athletes, 77 female and 54 male, participated in the quantitative phase of the study. The online survey included the Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS), a 43-item, 4-point Likert scale measure, and a Basic Demographics Questionnaire (BDQ). The EBBS measured perceived benefits of and barriers to physical exercise. Statistical analysis revealed no strong correlations between the EBBS factors and demographic data. An eight-factor solution resulted, with five benefits (psycho-physical competence, daily functional efficiency, psycho-emotional stability, preventative health, and social interaction) and three barriers (personal inconvenience, physical exertion, and family encouragement). The eight-factor solution correlated strongly with the original nine-factor solution from Sechrist, Walker, and Pender (1987). Nine participants, five men and four women, participated in follow-up interviews. Interviews were performed at a time and place convenient for the rower. The purpose of the interview was to elicit specific, genuine, rich content related to their rowing experience and how the benefits and barriers to physical activity and their place in rowing culture affect exercise adherence. Using an inductive-deductive approach prescribed by grounded theory, two core categories and additional sub-categories were developed in the coding process. From the data analysis, hindering factors and facilitating factors emerged as the core categories. Physical conditioning and health, optimization of personal characteristics, psycho-emotional stability, strong social community, environment, and interpretation of perceived barriers were subsumed under facilitating factors. The following sub-themes were contained in hindering factors: exercise demands, environment, and social issues. Rowers perceived strongly the benefits of their rowing experience, and stated that barriers are inherent to exercise and they are responsible for adapting to them.
dc.format.extent156 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectKinesiology
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectBarriers
dc.subjectBenefits
dc.subjectExercise Adherence
dc.subjectQualitative
dc.subjectRowing
dc.subjectSport Psychology
dc.titleROWERS' PERCEPTIONS OF EXERCISE ADHERENCE AND ROWING CULTURE: A MIXED-METHODS INVESTIGATION
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberSchifter, Catherine
dc.description.departmentKinesiology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2262
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.S.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T15:10:51Z


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