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dc.contributor.advisorGiovannetti, Tania
dc.creatorRhodes, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T15:10:46Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T15:10:46Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2238
dc.description.abstractObjective: Grit is a noncognitive trait related to perseverance and consistent pursuit of long-term goals. Research on grit and aging provides evidence that grit increases with age and may be protective of cognitive and everyday functioning. However, no studies to date have examined relations between concurrently measured grit, cognitive abilities, and everyday functioning. This study tested two hypotheses: 1) that grit would predict cognitive performance and that this relation would be moderated by clinical diagnosis of cognitive status (i.e., healthy vs. mild cognitive impairment; MCI), and 2) that grit would predict everyday functioning and that this effect would be mediated by compensatory strategy use. Methods: Sixty-one older adults were recruited from the Penn Memory Center’s National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center (NACC) cohort, including forty healthy controls with normal cognition and twenty-one individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants completed tests of verbal episodic memory, executive functioning, grit, compensatory strategy use, and everyday functioning. Results: Grit was not associated with cognitive functioning in either domain. Instead, memory performance was predicted only by clinical status (healthy vs. MCI), and executive functioning was predicted by clinical status, depressive symptoms, and years of education. Grit was negatively associated with everyday functional difficulties; however, there was no indirect effect of compensatory strategy use. Additionally, grit was moderately correlated with depression symptoms (r = -0.41). Conclusions: Grit is predictive of preserved everyday functioning, but not cognitive functioning, in a sample of healthy older adults and individuals with MCI. Mechanisms explaining the role of grit on everyday function remain elusive, though secondary analyses support that grit also influences affective well-being and may have a weaker role in the context of cognitive impairment.
dc.format.extent50 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectAging
dc.subjectEveryday Functioning
dc.subjectExecutive Functioning
dc.subjectGrit
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectMild Cognitive Impairment
dc.titleGRIT AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING IN HEALTHY AGING AND MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDrabick, Deborah A.
dc.contributor.committeememberSteinberg, Laurence D., 1952-
dc.contributor.committeememberChein, Jason M.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael S.
dc.contributor.committeememberMechanic-Hamilton, Dawn
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2220
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T15:10:46Z


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