• Addressing the Housing Crisis: Challenges and Innovations

      Levine, Judith A.; Hammar, Colin J.; Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2021)
    • Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19

      Burris, Scott; de Guia, Sarah; Gable, Lance; Levin, Donna E.; Parmet, Wendy E.; Terry, Nicolas P.; Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University); ChangeLab Solutions; Wayne State University; The Network for Public Health Law; et al. (2020-08)
      In August 2020, as the nation continued to address the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which had resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths and a severe economic recession, 50 top national experts offered an assessment of the U.S. policy response to the crisis. The research details the widespread failure of the country’s leadership in planning and executing a cohesive, national response, and how the crisis exposed weaknesses in the nation’s health care and public health systems. In Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19, the authors also offer recommendations on how federal, state and local leaders can better respond to COVID-19 and future pandemics.
    • Assuring Access to Abortion

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University) (2021)
      Over the spring of 2020, numerous states announced measures suspending abortions in response to COVID-19. Banning abortion during the pandemic is counterproductive. Impeding access to abortion will not help preserve healthcare resources. Moreover, prohibiting access to abortion care exacerbates the strain on the healthcare system. People who lack access to abortions will travel to neighboring states, induce their own abortions, or carry pregnancies to term, which will require prenatal care and assistance in childbirth. Perhaps more importantly, the people hit hardest by suspending abortion care are those for whom the pandemic already has had devastating effects. Lifting restrictions on medication abortion and expanding telehealth abortion services will conserve healthcare resources and improve public health. Recognizing the advantages of telemedicine, some states, as well as the federal government, have relaxed restrictions on remote diagnosis and treatment. However, many of those same states have carved out exceptions for abortion in their telemedicine policies. In addition, people seeking medication abortions still face unnecessary restrictions on access, none of which are applied to comparable office-based procedures. Policymakers can eliminate barriers to safe abortion services now and in the future. “No-touch” terminations, in which all medical supervision happens over the telephone or online, can better accomplish the goals that the present abortion suspensions cannot. Telehealth for medical abortion can ease the burdens on pregnant people, healthcare workers, and health systems in light of the unprecedented challenges presented by COVID-19.
    • COVID-19 Policy Playbook II: Legal Recommendations for a Safer, More Equitable Future

      Burris, Scott; de Guia, Sarah; Gable, Lance; Levin, Donna E.; Parmet, Wendy E.; Terry, Nicolas P.; Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University); ChangeLab Solutions; Wayne State University; The Network for Public Health Law; et al. (2021-03)
      The United States continues to address and recover from the year-old COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in more than 500,000 deaths so far and a historic economic recession. Fifty top legal experts convene to offer a new assessment of the U.S. policy response to the crisis, COVID-19 Policy Playbook: Legal Recommendations for a Safer, More Equitable Future, and recommend policy solutions at all levels of government, as the nation works to quell the current crisis and carry out plans to rebuild.
    • COVID-19: Challenges for Higher Education

      Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2020-08-18)
    • #RealCollege 2021: Basic Needs Insecurity During the Ongoing Pandemic

      The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice (Temple University) (Temple University. The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 2021-03-31)
      Entering the fall 2020 term, higher education was reeling from the coronavirus pandemic. Enrollment was down—particularly among students most at risk of basic needs insecurity; fewer students had completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); and college retention rates had dropped. Students and faculty were stressed and anxious. By the end of the term, more than 267,000 Americans died. At the same time, the federal government pumped an unprecedented $6 billion into student emergency aid via the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This report examines the pandemic’s impact on #RealCollege students who were able to continue their education in this challenging environment. Using our sixth annual #RealCollege Survey, fielded in fall 2020, we assessed students’ basic needs security and their well-being, as indicated by employment status, academic engagement, and mental health. In total, over 195,000 students from 130 two-year colleges and 72 four-year colleges and universities responded to the 2020 #RealCollege Survey.
    • Securing the Basic Needs of College Students in Greater Philadelphia During a Pandemic: A #RealCollegePHL Report

      The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice (Temple University) (Temple University. The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 2021-05)
      Philadelphia-area colleges and universities were reeling from the coronavirus pandemic as they entered fall 2020. Mirroring national trends, enrollment was down, particularly among those students most at risk of basic needs insecurity; fewer students completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); and college retention rates dropped. Students and faculty were stressed and anxious. By the end of the term, local hospitals spent weeks caring for almost a thousand Philadelphians suffering with and often dying from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. This report examines how Philadelphia-area students and institutions fared during that exceptionally challenging time. The data come from our sixth-annual #RealCollege Survey, which assessed students’ experiences of food and housing insecurity, homelessness, employment, mental health, and academic engagement. While past work by The Hope Center indicates that more than half of area two-year students and about one-third of area four-year students experience food and/or housing insecurity, and more than one in 10 experience homelessness, this report sheds light on the unique challenges faced in 2020 during the pandemic. The report is part of our #RealCollegePHL project, which aims to document basic needs insecurity among area college students and to bolster institutional and community efforts to address those needs. In the Philadelphia region, the survey was distributed to more than 82,700 students attending 13 colleges and universities, and taken by 8,953 students, yielding an estimated response rate of 11%.
    • The Convergence of the COVID-19 and Opioid Health Crises in the US

      Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2020-08-18)
    • The Hardest Hit: Post-COVID Unemployment in Immigrant-Dense Industries

      Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2020-08-18)
    • Unequal Impact: COVID-19 and Early Childhood Education

      Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2020-09-03)