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dc.contributor.advisorBetancourt, Philip P.
dc.creatorPeterson, Sarah Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T14:46:38Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T14:46:38Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2141
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines trends in the production of pottery at Mycenae in the Late Helladic (LH) IIIC period (ca. 1200–1125 B.C.E) through the analysis of published ceramic material from the site. It includes my own study of select unpublished material from recent excavations on the Citadel (Building Kappa) and in the Lower Town. The LH IIIC period, considered the beginning of the Dark Ages in Greece, immediately followed the end of the Mycenaean palatial system, a phenomenon referred to as the Collapse. The Collapse is characterized by the complete destruction of many sites, possible loss of population, and a decrease in the number of occupied areas, and the subsequent LH IIIC period is associated with socioeconomic, demographic, and artistic decline. There are, however, notable indications of continued activity at many Greek mainland sites, a notable sign being the proliferation of elaborate vase painting. Through an examination of how certain pottery shapes and decorative styles were manufactured and utilized at LH IIIC Mycenae, key trends and developments can be discerned, and the changing preferences of the market for which these objects were produced can be understood. I conclude that these developments can be characterized as intentional responses of potters to the crisis that followed the demise of the palatial administration. Potters in LH IIIC were able to create and exploit a sustainable market, one that both reflected and influenced shifting political and social realities of communities now operating outside of a palace-dominated system; their advances would influence pottery production in Greece for centuries to come.
dc.format.extent689 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectArt History
dc.titleLate Helladic IIIC Pottery at Mycenae: Production Trends after the Collapse of Palatial Administration
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEvans, Jane D.
dc.contributor.committeememberMyer, George H.
dc.contributor.committeememberKoehl, Robert B.
dc.description.departmentArt History
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2123
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T14:46:38Z


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