Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKendall, Philip C.
dc.creatorPeterman, Jeremy Scott
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T14:46:37Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T14:46:37Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.other965642587
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2138
dc.description.abstractResearch supports shared neurological, cognitive, and environmental features among youth with sleep-related problems (SRPs) and anxiety. Despite overlap in interventions for SRPs and anxiety, little is known about the secondary benefit on SRPs following anxiety-focused treatment. The present study examined whether SRPs improved following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with anxiety disorders. It also examined whether variables that may link anxiety and sleep problems (e.g. pre-sleep arousal, family accommodation, sleep hygiene) changed across treatment, and whether said changes predicted SRPs at posttreatment. Youth were diagnosed with anxiety at pretreatment and received weekly CBT that targeted their principal anxiety diagnosis at one of two specialty clinics (N = 69 completers, Mage = 10.86, 45% males). Youth completed a sleep diary between pretreatment and session one and again one week prior to posttreatment. All other measures were administered in the first session and at the posttreatment assessment. Results indicated that parent-reported SRPs improved from pre- to post-treatment and that treatment responders yielded greater improvement than nonresponders. Specific areas of bedtime resistance and sleep anxiety showed significant improvement. Youth reported lower rates of SRPs and no pre- to post-treatment changes. Pre-sleep arousal and parental accommodation decreased over treatment but did not predict lower SRPs at posttreatment. However, higher accommodation positively correlated with greater SRPs. Sleep hygiene evidenced no change and did not mediate accommodation and posttreatment SRPs. Clinical implications for the treatment of anxious youth are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.
dc.format.extent135 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectCbt
dc.subjectChild Health
dc.subjectCognitive Behavioral Therapy
dc.subjectSleep
dc.titleThe Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Youth Anxiety on Sleep Problems
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberGosch, Elizabeth A.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2120
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T14:46:37Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Peterman_temple_0225E_12171.pdf
Size:
702.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record