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dc.contributor.advisorCromley, Jennifer
dc.creatorPerez, Anthony Charles
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T14:46:37Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T14:46:37Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885485
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2132
dc.description.abstractStudents who initially choose STEM majors frequently switch to non-STEM majors. Additionally, there are national concerns over the paucity of homegrown scientists, and college is a potentially critical period when many potential scientists are lost. The aim of this study was to examine, over the course of a semester, the role of identity formation and motivation in students' intent to leave a STEM major. Participants included 363 diverse undergraduate science students enrolled in chemistry II. Measures of achieved ego-identity status, competency beliefs, task values, perceived costs, interest, self-efficacy, chemistry II grades, and intent to leave a STEM major were given over four waves of data collection. Regression analysis and cross-lagged path analysis were the primary analytical methods. Results revealed that achieved ego-identity status significantly predicted competency beliefs, values/interest, and effort costs; however, achieved ego-identity status was not related to opportunity or psychological costs. Competency beliefs of the major was a significant predictor of chemistry II grades, and values and effort cost were significant predictors of intent to leave STEM. Opportunity cost was only significantly related to intent to leave STEM at the end of the semester and psychological cost was not significantly related to students' intent to leave STEM. These results provide evidence for theorized relationships between identity formation, competency beliefs, task values, and perceived costs. Furthermore, perceived cost was demonstrated to be a multi-dimensional construct with important implications for students' intent to leave STEM.
dc.format.extent214 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational Psychology
dc.subjectCost
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectMotivation
dc.subjectPersistence in Stem
dc.subjectTask Value
dc.titleValuing STEM majors: The Role of Occupational-Academic Ego-Identity Status and Task Values in STEM Persistence
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberKaplan, Avi
dc.contributor.committeememberByrnes, James P.
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberHorvat, Erin McNamara, 1964-
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2114
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T14:46:37Z


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