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dc.contributor.advisorSachs, Michael L.
dc.creatorPark, Gloria H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T14:46:31Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T14:46:31Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.other864884776
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2100
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between extracurricular activity participation and concurrent and longitudinal youth academic and psychosocial development in academically gifted youth. Extracurricular activity participation as a potential protective factor against the negative effects of life events, and the theoretical role of personality/activity fit as a determinant of positive developmental benefits in youth were also explored in this study. Secondary data analysis was conducted using data provided by two cohorts of middle school youth from a public magnet school in Philadelphia. After controlling for sociodemographic selection factors, Study 1 revealed that music was the only type of activity that was related to academic achievement. Time spent in music significantly contributed to predicting performance on reading, language, math and science standardized exams. Sport made significant negative contributions to predicting reading and language exam scores. These findings were limited by a ceiling effect caused by high mean scores on grade point average and standardized exams. Sport/dance was the only activity associated with well-being, significantly contributing to the prediction of positive affect. The results also revealed nonlinear associations between time spent in activities and standardized math scores, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and grit. The results of Study 2 revealed support for the protective role of activity participation on the negative academic and psychosocial impact of life events stress, which was a significant predictor of poorer adolescent outcomes across all of the domains. Accounting for the impact of life events, music positively predicted academic outcomes, and sport/dance positively predicted higher life satisfaction, positive affect, and self-esteem, and lower levels of negative affect. Finally, exploratory analyses revealed that youth participated in activities that appeared to be compatible with personality characteristics. For example, sport was associated with higher extraversion and music with higher openness to experience.
dc.format.extent238 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectKinesiology
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology
dc.subjectAcademics
dc.subjectExtracurricular Activity
dc.subjectMiddle School
dc.subjectWell Being
dc.subjectYouth Development
dc.titleThe Role of Extracurricular Activity in Positive Youth Development
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberNapolitano, Melissa A.
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberGlutting, Joseph
dc.description.departmentKinesiology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2082
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T14:46:31Z


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