ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

The Produced at Temple collections focus on books, working papers, reports and more from centers and other organizations on the Temple University campus.

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Recent Submissions

  • Eviction and the Necessary Conditions for Health

    Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2021-10-09)
    The COVID-19 pandemic both highlighted eviction as a public health crisis and exacerbated the problem. In a new article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, housing law experts, Katie Moran-McCabe and Scott Burris at the Temple University Center for Public Health Law Research, call for a realignment in how we think about and approach the housing crisis — and eviction in particular — in America. Moran-McCabe and Burris call for a national recognition of housing as a fundamental need, and offer a few practical recommendations on where governments may start: 1. Removing barriers to affordable, integrated development to increase the supply of new affordable housing in neighborhoods of opportunity; 2. Using legal tools to stabilize housing prices and tenancy, such as rent-stabilization laws and just-cause eviction laws; 3. Addressing economic barriers, such as high housing costs and low income for tenants, by raising the minimum wage, changing tax policies, and fully funding the federal housing voucher program. These recommendations are among many others originally presented in the sixth report in a comprehensive series for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2020, Health Equity through Housing: A Blueprint for Systematic Legal Action.
  • Exploring the Legal Response to Unpredictable Scheduling Burdens for Women in the Workplace

    Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2021-10-28)
    Unpredictable scheduling practices subject workers to irregular and inconsistent work hours and provide them with little to no control over their schedules. These practices have been shown to cause negative health outcomes including increased stress, food and housing insecurity, and negative effects on mental and emotional wellbeing. In this project, funded by the TIME’S UP Foundation as part of the inaugural class of researchers of the Time’s Up Measure Up initiative, Center for Public Health Law Research staff explored laws at the federal, state, and local level that regulate workplace scheduling to better understand how laws that seek to address unpredictable scheduling affect women in the workplace prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Identifying data for the empirical assessment of law (IDEAL): A realist approach to research gaps on the health effects of abortion law

    Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2021-06-11)
    Reproductive rights have been the focus of United Nations consensus documents, a priority for agencies like the WHO, and the subject of judgments issued by national and international courts. Human rights approaches have galvanised abortion law reform across numerous countries, but human rights analysis is not designed to empirically assess how legal provisions regulating abortion shape the actual delivery of abortion services and outcomes. Reliable empirical measurement of the health and social effects of abortion regulation is vital input for policymakers and public health guidance for abortion policy and practice, but research focused explicitly on assessing the health effects of abortion law and policy is limited at the global level. This paper describes a method for Identifying Data for the Empirical Assessment of Law (IDEAL), to assess potential health effects of abortion regulations. The approach was applied to six critical legal interventions: mandatory waiting periods, third-party authorisation, gestational limits, criminalisation, provider restrictions and conscientious objection. The IDEAL process allowed researchers to link legal interventions and processes that have not been investigated fully in empirical research to processes and outcomes that have been more thoroughly studied. To the extent these links are both transparent and plausible, using IDEAL to make them explicit allows both researchers and policy stakeholders to make better informed assessments and guidance related to abortion law. The IDEAL method also identifies gaps in scientific research. Given the importance of law to public health generally, the utility of IDEAL is not limited to abortion law.
  • The “Legal Epidemiology” of Pandemic Control

    Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2021-05-27)
  • Individual Liberty, Public Health, and the Battle for the Nation’s Soul

    Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2021-06-07)
  • Toward a More Level Playing Field: A Navigator Program for Philadelphia’s Debt-Collection Court

    The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University); Access to Justice Clinic (Temple University) (2022-05-09)
  • A Tenant’s Guide to Suing Your Landlord: Holding Landlords Accountable for Unsafe Housing Conditions

    Lee, Jennifer L.; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University); Tenant Union Representative Network (Temple University); Social Justice Lawyering Clinic (Temple University) (2021-09-07)
  • Redesign of the FJD Web Site

    Rieser, Len; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University) (2022-04-21)
  • Preventing Unfair Default Judgments in Debt Collection Cases: Proposals for a Compliance Checklist

    Rieser, Len; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University); Access to Justice Clinic (Temple University) (2022-01-03)
  • Strengthening the Office of the Public Defender: Analysis and Recommendations for Montgomery County

    Sibley, Shanda; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University) (2021-05-12)
  • Recommendations to Enhance the First Judicial District Web Site

    Rieser, Len; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University); Access to Justice Clinic (Temple University) (2022-04-21)
  • Dismantling ICE in Pennsylvania: Toolkit of Model Policies

    Lee, Jennifer L.; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University) (2020-02-24)
  • Enhancing Due Process in Consumer Debt Proceedings

    Rieser, Len; The Sheller Center for Social Justice (Temple University) (2020-12-30)
  • Marijuana Legalization and Automatic Criminal Record Expungement

    Public Policy Lab (Temple University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2022-04-12)
  • Child Poverty in America: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Levine, Judith A.; Hammar, Colin J.; Public Policy Lab (Temple University); United States. Congress. Senate; Duke University. Sanford School of Public Policy; Child Welfare League of America (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2022-04-21)
  • The Hidden Local Costs of Hurricanes

    Public Policy Lab (Temple University); 21st Century Cities Initiative (Johns Hopkins University) (Temple University. Public Policy Lab, 2022-02-08)
  • Moving to Mobile: Space as a Service in the Academic Library

    Bell, Steven; Bell|0000-0003-3916-4013 (2022-04-15)
    In an academic environment that is shifting to hybrid learning modes, librarians must reimagine their space as a service delivered to students. Where do desktop computer labs fit into this vision for libraries that prioritize mobile-first strategies? This article provides a case study of an academic library transitioning to a post-desktop space with recommendations for a successful project.
  • Chapter 11.1 Supplemental Data: Designing Place-based Experiments

    University of Queensland; George Mason University (Temple University. Libraries, 2023)
  • Chapter 13.3 Supplemental Data: Gunshot Detection System Evaluation

    Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville (Temple University. Libraries, 2023)
  • Chapter 12.1 Supplemental Data: Measuring Displacement

    University College, London (Temple University. Libraries, 2023)

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