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dc.contributor.advisorBooth, Julie L.
dc.creatorMurphy, Krista Bailey
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T15:28:03Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T15:28:03Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other870266856
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1977
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated high risk behaviors in a population of college students through the use of a large, national quantitative data set and individual qualitative interviews. Since millions of students are enrolled in higher education, which often comes at a great financial cost and sacrifice to them and their families (Henretta, Wolf, Van Voorhis & Soldo, 2012), this is a particularly important population to study. Additionally, despite being a time of optimal health, adolescence is also a time of increased mortality, particularly as it relates to social morbidities (Resnick et al., 1997). While risk taking amongst college students manifests itself in many ways, the primary focus of this research will be on alcohol use, drug use and sexual behavior. Recent research in the field, including the composite measure of psychosocial maturity (Steinberg, Cauffman, Woolard, Graham & Banich, 2009a), the social neuroscience perspective (Steinberg, 2008) and current trends in alcohol use, drug use and sexual behaviors amongst college students were examined. The American College Health Association National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II) provided statistically significant evidence that students who drink more (frequency and quantity) have lower overall GPAs, experience more negative consequences as a result of their drinking and experience more impediments to academic success. Students who live on campus, are members of Greek fraternities and sororities and/or are varsity athletes engage in higher levels of binge drinking than their peers. Additionally, students who drink more (frequency and quantity) engage in other risky behaviors (unprotected sex, NMPD use, etc.) at higher rates than their peers. Qualitative interviews with high achieving students who engaged in various levels of risk taking resulted in the explication of six distinct themes: defining and conceptualizing risk taking, decision making, painting a picture of individual risk taking, academic achievement, peer perceptions and influence, and achieving both (what allows a high risk student to also be high achieving). In addition to the above analyses, the present study also examines implications for practitioners and directions for future research.
dc.format.extent231 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational Psychology
dc.subjectAcademic Achievement
dc.subjectAlcohol
dc.subjectCollege Students
dc.subjectNational College Health Assessment
dc.subjectQualitative Interviews
dc.subjectRisk-taking
dc.titleCOLLEGE STUDENT RISK TAKING AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE: A QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS USING THE NATIONAL COLLEGE HEALTH ASSESSMENT II AND INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEWS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberByrnes, James P.
dc.contributor.committeememberSchifter, Catherine
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberFarley, Frank
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1959
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-27T15:28:03Z


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