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dc.contributor.advisorDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.creatorLui, Mung Mei
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T15:14:16Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T15:14:16Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.other864884605
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1782
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence in predicting parenting self-efficacy, academic self-efficacy, academic achievement, and school attendance among a sample of adolescent mothers. A battery of instruments was administered to a sample of 108 high school students who were enrolled in the Employment Leading to Education and Career Training (ELECT) Program. The students ranged from 16- to 21-years of age and were enrolled between the 10th and 12th grade. Emotional intelligence was assessed with the Bar-On Emotional Quotient: Short Version (EQ-i:S), and self-efficacy variables were measured with the Self-Efficacy for Learning Form-Abridged (SELF-A) and the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC). Moderate and significant correlations were found between emotional intelligence and both parenting and academic self-efficacy measures. Despite a positive relationship with academic self-efficacy, emotional intelligence was not found to correlate with student achievement or school attendance, with the exception of Social Studies achievement. The investigation of length of time parenting revealed no relations with parenting self-efficacy beliefs or school outcome variables such as grade point averages or attendance. Results also indicated that the level of involvement from the child's father did not correlate with this sample of adolescent mothers' perception of parenting satisfaction. However, parenting satisfaction and school achievement were negatively correlated with their satisfaction with available social support networks.
dc.format.extent182 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, General
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology
dc.subjectAcademic Achievement
dc.subjectAdolescent Mothers
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligence
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectTeen Mothers
dc.titleCan I Succeed as an Adolescent Mother? Examining the Role of Emotional Intelligence in Predicting Self-Efficacy, Academic Achievement, and School Attendance
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFarley, Frank
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenfeld, Joseph G.
dc.contributor.committeememberRotheram-Fuller, Erin
dc.contributor.committeememberFullard, William
dc.description.departmentSchool Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1764
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-27T15:14:16Z


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