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dc.contributor.advisorFarley, Frank H.
dc.creatorLipschutz, Betsy D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T15:14:12Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T15:14:12Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.other864884915
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1746
dc.description.abstractSchool safety is one of the most important issues facing administrators, teachers, and parents. Several risk factors have been identified as antecedents to aggression including poor social skills, difficulty dealing with anger and frustration, and inadequate problem solving abilities. No Child Left Behind requires all schools receiving Title IV funds to implement research based violence interventions. Second Step, an internationally recognized violence prevention curriculum published by Committee for Children was implemented in an urban elementary school with 66 African American students in grades 3 through 5 for 9 weeks. This study employed a randomized control group design with two treatment conditions; Second Step instruction and Second Step instruction with digital role-playing, an adaptation of digital storytelling, to increase program effectiveness and intensify student motivation. The School Social Behavior Scales-2 (Merrell, 2002) was used to assess differences in aggression and prosocial skills. MANOVA indicated significant differences for grade only. Older students had higher prosocial behavior scores and younger students had lower scores on the program's content assessment. Results indicated that the Second Step curriculum did not affect behavior. Although the benefits of teaching students to respond empathetically to others, solve problems, and control anger have been documented in the literature, the use of Second Step to accomplish these goals has not been supported.
dc.format.extent119 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction
dc.subjectConflict Resolution Education
dc.subjectDigital Storytelling
dc.subjectPositive Behavior Support
dc.subjectPrevention Science
dc.subjectSocial and Emotional Learning
dc.titleThe Use of Digital Storytelling to Improve the Effectiveness of Social and Conflict Resolution Skill Training for Elementary Students
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenfeld, Joseph G.
dc.contributor.committeememberStahler, Gerald
dc.contributor.committeememberFiorello, Catherine A.
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1728
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-27T15:14:12Z


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