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dc.contributor.advisorBruscia, Kenneth E.
dc.creatorKim, Seung-A
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:49Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.other864884879
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1615
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to examine factors such as the number of years lived in the U.S., English proficiency, neuroticism, openness, and music therapy student academic stress (MTSAS) that predict acculturative stress among international music therapy students studying in the U.S. An on-line survey was conducted with a U.S. sample of international music therapy students. Among the 134 participants who originally came from 25 countries returned the survey, 97 with complete data (88 women and 9 men; 38 undergraduate and 59 graduate students) were included in the main analyses. Results showed this sample had a substantially higher mean on acculturative stress (M = 83.04) than the normative mean (M = 66.32) reported by Sandhu and Asrabadi (1994). In addition, 13 participants' (12.89%) scores were within the "high risk" category, indicating the need for psychological intervention. Asian students were found to have experienced a higher level of acculturative stress than their European counterparts. There were no significant differences found between undergraduate and graduate students relating to levels of acculturative stress. Correlational analyses indicated that acculturative stress had significant correlations with level of English proficiency, neuroticism, and MTSAS. There were no significant findings regarding years lived in the U.S., openness, and level of acculturative stress. Regression analyses revealed that (a) the entire set of 5 aforementioned predictors accounted for 41% of variance in acculturative stress, which is considered a large effect size, and (b) among these predictors, English proficiency, neuroticism, and MTSAS appeared to be the most powerful predictors of acculturative stress. In addition, making presentations, taking exams, and participating in class discussion were found to be the most stressful classroom activities. Implications for music therapy and future research directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent149 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectEducation, Music
dc.subjectAcculturation
dc.subjectAcculturative Stress
dc.subjectInternational Music Therapy Students
dc.subjectInternational Students
dc.subjectMusic Therapy
dc.subjectMusic Therapy Education and Training
dc.titlePREDICTORS OF ACCULTURATIVE STRESS AMONG INTERNATIONAL MUSIC THERAPY STUDENTS IN THE U.S.
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAigen, Kenneth
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Alison M.
dc.description.departmentMusic Therapy
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1597
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:49Z


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