Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorNorment, Nathaniel
dc.creatorKey, Andre Eugene
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:47Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:47Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885276
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1605
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the problem of ethnic suffering and moral evil in Black Judaism. Black Judaism has been traditionally studied along anthropological and sociological lines, as a result, the core beliefs and theological issues which animate the faith tradition have not been the subject of critical study. This dissertation uses an African-American centered theoretical perspective and a black theology methodological approach to produce an autoethnography of my experiences living as a member of the Hebrew Israelite community. This study suggests that Black Judaism is best understood through an examination of the problem of black theodicy meaning the belief in an omnipotent and benevolent deity while acknowledging the historical oppression of African Americans. Black Judaism articulates a belief in black theodicy which asserts that African Americans are victims of divine punishment and must "repent" in order to experience liberation from ethnic suffering and moral evil in the form of anti-Black racism and white supremacy. This belief in deserved punishment has led Black Judaism into a state of mis-religion. By engaging in the process of gnosiological conversion I will identify the oppressive features of Black Judaism and offer corrective measures. Finally, this dissertation will discuss ways in which Black Judaism can conceive of liberation without the need for appeals to redemptive suffering. Concomitantly I will discuss the articulation of a Hebrew Israelite ethno-religious identity which is not predicated on the belief of redemptive suffering. Instead, I propose the basis for a restructuring of the core beliefs of Black Judaism based on humanocentric theism.
dc.format.extent257 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAfrican American Studies
dc.subjectJudaic Studies
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectBlack Jews
dc.subjectHebrew Israelites
dc.subjectTheodicy
dc.titleWhat's My Name? An Autoethnography of Ethnic Suffering and Moral Evil in Black Judaism
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberMonteiro, Anthony B.
dc.contributor.committeememberAlpert, Rebecca T. (Rebecca Trachtenberg), 1950-
dc.contributor.committeememberGordon, Lewis R. (Lewis Ricardo), 1962-
dc.description.departmentAfrican American Studies
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1587
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:47Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Key_temple_0225E_10795.pdf
Size:
1.554Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record