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dc.contributor.advisorCollins, Bradley N.
dc.creatorIsselmann, Katherine Freney
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:34Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:34Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.other864884557
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1507
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Recent research indicates that breastfeeding may be protective against obesity risk. The purpose of the proposed study is to investigate the possible associations between breastfeeding, later maternal feeding strategies, and later child eating behaviors that could protect against obesity. Methods: This study examined hypothesized associations between infant feeding type (breastfed [BF], bottle-fed breastmilk [PUMP], bottle-fed formula [FM]) and both current child eating styles (internal cues in eating) and current maternal feeding styles (related to control) in a sample of three to six year old children. Infant feeding information was obtained via retrospective self-report with medical chart verification. Maternal feeding styles of "restriction" and "monitoring" and child eating behaviors of "satiety responsiveness" and "food responsiveness," were measured through validated questionnaires. It was hypothesized that children who were breastfed without bottle would have less maternal restriction and monitoring in their feeding and higher satiety response and lower food responsiveness than children who were breastfed with bottle or formula fed. Exploratory hypotheses were examined: (1) Maternal feeding and child eating behaviors were examined for interrelations and (2) Maternal feeding and child eating styles were explored for their relationship with obesity measures. Results: Among the 111 mothers, the mother-child pairs were classified in groups as follows: 41 BF, 25 PUMP, and 45 FORM. One-way ANOVA analyses did not find significant mean differences between these groups in restriction, monitoring, satiety response, and food responsiveness. However, multivariate analyses found the PUMP group had an unadjusted odds ratio of 0.33 (95% CI: 0.12-0.96) for high satiety level and after adjustment for child gender, maternal BMI, maternal educational level, maternal race, and maternal restraint in her own eating, the odds ratio was reduced to 0.27 (95% CI: 0.07-0.98). Correlations were found between the CFQ and CEBQ subscales. Correlations were found between food responsiveness and obesity outcomes, and satiety response and lower BMI. Discussion: This evidence supports the suggestion that breastfeeding without a bottle might allow infants to grow to have more positive eating behaviors. Future studies should expand upon these strategies in a prospective manner to promote clearer understanding of the breastfeeding-obesity factors.
dc.format.extent103 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition
dc.subjectBreastfeeding
dc.subjectChild Health
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.subjectObesity
dc.titleEvaluating Breastfeeding's Role Early Childhood Feeding and Eating Styles
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Deborah
dc.contributor.committeememberDaly, Brian P.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCoy, Andrea
dc.description.departmentPublic Health
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1489
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:34Z


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