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dc.contributor.advisorGjesdal, Kristin
dc.creatorHrehor, Kristin A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:29Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:29Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1467
dc.description.abstractViolent content in film has been extensively debated from a myriad of different perspectives, and both within and across a number of different disciplines. Oftentimes, the more violent the content that a film contains, the more likely such content is considered to negatively detract from the value of the work in question. However, this dissertation provides an argument to the contrary with respect to a specific set of cinematic examples and a particular way in which violent content is represented within them. In what follows, I argue that there are grounds to believe in the philosophical value of engaging with works that “morally shock” their audiences through the representation of violent content. First, by analyzing a combination of works ranging from the more conservative American classic Deliverance (1972) to the more controversial French avant-garde Irréversible (2002), I provide a case for reclassifying violent films into different genres, only one of which contains films which elicit a particular kind of response that I single out for further examination. In considering the implications of our responses to these “morally shocking” films, I provide a foundation against which such films can be considered to have a distinct kind of philosophical value by exploring their significance with respect to: (1) issues of interpretation and value in the philosophy of film, (2) recent developments in research on moral judgment, and (3) arguments both for and against the idea that film can be thought of as a kind of philosophy. Ultimately, I argue that our response of moral shock to the content of these films has the subversive effect of destabilizing our moral orientation and consequently motivating philosophical reflection in innovative ways.
dc.format.extent246 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPhilosophy
dc.subjectFilm Studies
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectFilm
dc.subjectMoral Content
dc.subjectMoral Judgment
dc.subjectMoral Shock
dc.subjectPhilosophy of Film
dc.subjectViolence
dc.titleViolent Content in Film: A Defense of the Morally Shocking
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFeagin, Susan L., 1948-
dc.contributor.committeememberMargolis, Joseph, 1924-
dc.contributor.committeememberCarroll, Noël, 1947-
dc.description.departmentPhilosophy
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1449
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:29Z


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