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dc.contributor.advisorBeglar, David
dc.creatorHorness, Paul Martin
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:28Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:28Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other870266843
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1462
dc.description.abstractThis study was an investigation into the effects of repetition on a listening comprehension test for second language learners. Repetition has been previously examined in a cursory way, usually as a secondary question to a primary treatment. Additionally, the method of repetition was limited to one way and to one treatment condition; therefore, it is not clear how different methods of repetition have influenced the results. To date, there are few studies on the influence of repetition on listening comprehension tests in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) situations. The purpose of this study was to examine four methods of repetition on listening comprehension with Japanese learners of English. In addition, the effect of repetition method on proficiency level, question type, and question difficulty was also examined. The participants were 2,041 students attending a private university in Tokyo, Japan. They experienced five conditions: non-repetition, immediate repetition, delayed repetition theory, delayed repetition A, and delayed repetition B. The participants listened to 12 passages under one of the five randomized conditions, and then answered five questions in one of three question types: true-false, multiple-choice, or short-answer. Additionally, the test included questions intended to measure two levels of comprehension, specific details and inference. Finally, the participants were divided into two listening proficiency levels based on the Global Test of English Communication. The results indicated that the type of repetition had an effect on listening comprehension. Overall, both proficiency groups in the delayed repetition conditions had higher comprehension scores. In addition, the delayed repetition conditions were better for all question types (true-false, multiple-choice, and short-answer) with each proficiency group responding equally well. Finally, the delayed repetition conditions reduced the range of question difficulty, especially when participants were allowed to preview questions. The theoretical implications of this study are that comprehension scores are affected by the strength of memory trace, focus of attention, and activated memory. The pedagogical implications are that delayed repetition is useful in the classroom because it not only improves comprehension scores on tests, but also reinforces material learned across several activities, and incorporates recycling into the curriculum design. The results will help test-makers consider new avenues to testing, teachers to incorporate delayed repetition into classroom activities, and administrators to incorporate delayed repetition into the curriculum.
dc.format.extent246 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectForeign Language Instruction
dc.subjectEducational Tests & Measurements
dc.subjectEsl
dc.subjectListening
dc.subjectRasch
dc.subjectRepetition
dc.subjectSpacing Effect
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF REPETITION TYPES ON LISTENING TESTS IN AN EFL SETTING
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberRoss, Steven, 1951-
dc.contributor.committeememberSick, James
dc.contributor.committeememberPetchko, Katerina
dc.contributor.committeememberChilds, Marshall
dc.description.departmentCITE/Language Arts
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1444
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:28Z


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