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dc.contributor.advisorShore, Scott K.
dc.creatorHoffman, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:23Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:23Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885148
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1445
dc.description.abstractThe field of cancer therapeutic development has been dominated by two research and discovery paradigms, the cytotoxicity-based or phenotype driven strategy and the target-based rational approach. This thesis describes the standardization of novel assays used in both approaches and the discoveries made using these processes. Rational drug design or the target-based approach to discovering novel anti-cancer agents requires a basic understanding of the oncogenic signals that induce uncontrolled cellular proliferation. c-MET is a proto-oncogene, linked to a number of different cancers, that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase. As an oncogene, c-MET has been shown to transform cells in the laboratory setting and is dysregulated in number of malignancies. Thus, we sought to discover a small molecule inhibitor of c-MET kinase activity by screening a novel library of small molecules. In the second part of this dissertation, we describe the standardization of a high-throughput assay to identify putative c-MET inhibitors and the results of our screening attempt. Cytotoxicity-based screening is another validated approach that is used to discover anti-cancer agents. As a parallel program to our c-MET discovery effort, we designed a high-throughput cytotoxicity assay to identify a novel small molecule with high cytotoxic activity towards tumor cells. The result of this screen was the identification of ON015640, a novel anti-cancer therapeutic with tubulin-depolymerizing activity. Throughout the course of this project, we tried to discern the advantages and disadvantages of the two predominant paradigms in cancer therapeutic research. Both strategies require careful assay design and an acute understanding of the molecular and genetic underpinnings of cancer. While it is clear that structure-based rational drug design has its merits and its success stories, it has become increasingly clear that seeking out a desired biological effect may serve as a more effective staring point when dealing with cancers for which no clear oncogene addiction phenotype has been observed.
dc.format.extent121 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
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dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectDrug Discovery
dc.subjectTherapeutics
dc.titleThe Genetics of Cancer in Pharmacological Drug Development
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEngel, Nora
dc.contributor.committeememberDe Riel, Jon K.
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, Jeffrey
dc.description.departmentMolecular and Cellular Physiology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1427
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:23Z


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