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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, James Earl
dc.contributor.advisorLeonard, Jacqueline
dc.creatorHOBBS, ROBERT MAURICE
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:23Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:23Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885950
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1443
dc.description.abstractTeachers can use culturally relevant pedagogical strategies and technologies as emerging tools to improve students' problem-solving skills. The purpose of this study was to investigate and assess the effectiveness of culturally specific computer-based instructional tasks on ninth-grade African American mathematics students. This study tried to determine if problem-solving skills and overall mathematical achievement and attitude could be improved using these computer-based tasks. A culturally specific, computer-based mathematics assessment (CD-ROM) and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessment were used to measure student growth in mathematical problem solving. The Modified Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scales (MFSAS) were used to measure mathematics attitude. To determine whether or not the study was practical, an initial study was conducted (Study I) to see if pre- and post-tests would accurately forecast student performance. There were three groups for Study I. The two treatment groups worked in the computer lab on a Cognitive Tutor program to improve skills in Algebra 1. They were also exposed to word problems that were based on culturally specific themes. The control group had no exposure to the computer lab or word problems with culturally specific themes. Only one significant difference occurred in Study I. One of the treatment groups' data results declined significantly on the CD-ROM. In spite of this, the group revealed a slightly more favorable attitude towards mathematics than the other two groups. This treatment group also demonstrated the largest increase in NAEP pre- and post-test data results. For Study II there were two groups. The treatment group worked on a Google Maps project where students mapped different coordinates within their neighborhoods and plotted the results. The control group received computer lab instruction similar to the treatment group but did not work on Google Maps. When scores of the control and treatment groups on the CD-ROM assessment, NAEP assessment, and MFSAS survey were compared using a pre-test/post-test design in Study II, only one significant difference occurred. The control groups' CD-ROM scores resulted in nearly a 50% decline. A correlation analysis in Study II revealed that there were weak relationships between most of the measures, suggesting scores on each measure were unrelated.
dc.format.extent129 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation, Mathematics
dc.subjectEducational Technology
dc.subjectMulticultural Education
dc.subjectAfrican American Students and Math Education
dc.subjectComputers and Mathematics
dc.subjectComputers Use in A Multicultured Algebra Class
dc.subjectCulturally Relevant Specific Pedagogy
dc.subjectTeacher as Facilitator
dc.subjectTechnology and Math Education
dc.titleImproving Problem-Solving Techniques for Students in Low-Performing Schools
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberNewton, Kristie Jones
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.description.departmentCITE/Mathematics and Science Education
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1425
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:23Z


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