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dc.contributor.advisorGross, Steven Jay
dc.creatorHetzell, Leah
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1432
dc.description.abstractAs calls for institutions of higher education to educate globally competent citizens have intensified over the last two decades, the field of international service learning (ISL) has responded resoundingly. ISL programs have been implemented at many institutions and there have been countless studies that demonstrate the great power for student learning and growth inherent in this exciting educational tool. In more recent years, experts have moved away from studying the student experience and have, instead, questioned the power relationships inherent in service learning programs abroad; related studies have made use of newer critical theories and community development philosophies, which have advanced the field tremendously. However, to date, the re-entry period has still been largely overlooked, and there has been a noticeable lack of studies that apply student development theories to the ISL experience. This study explores how a diverse group of students from a large, public, four-year institution on the West Coast experience transformational learning during an ISL program in Thailand and how they make sense of their experience upon their return to the U.S. and in the months afterwards. By utilizing a case study design and implementing qualitative methods, this study provides significant evidence that well-designed ISL programs can trigger transformational learning in a variety of ways and that the re-entry period is a significant time of learning and growth for students. Further, the findings importantly show that by creating strategic opportunities for students to learn and connect with others on the program, both during and after the ISL experience, students are better able to navigate the changes in themselves after returning home. Finally, the experiences of the students indicate that the processes associated with transformational learning continue well on after the in-country experience, highlighting the significant need to provide support and guidance for students during this time.
dc.format.extent181 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational Administration
dc.subjectInternational Relations
dc.subjectGlobal Service Learning
dc.subjectInternational Service Learning
dc.subjectQualitative
dc.subjectStudent Affairs
dc.subjectThailand
dc.subjectTransformational Learning
dc.titleMANAGING TRANSFORMATION: HOW DO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS EXPERIENCE THE PROCESS OF REENTRY AFTER INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING?
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBelliveau, Cynthia S.
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, James Earl
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1414
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:21Z


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