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dc.contributor.advisorStrongin, Daniel R.
dc.creatorHao, Jun
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T19:19:15Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T19:19:15Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.other864884706
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1389
dc.description.abstractThe abiotic oxidation of pyrite requires the supply of oxygen and water only. In abiotic systems, pyrite oxidation may proceed via several paths, with multiple steps in each of the paths. Defect sites (S-deficient, Fe3+ bearing sites) on the pyrite surface have been shown reported to be the initial reaction sites on pristine pyrite surfaces. In neutral to slightly acidic solutions (3.5<pH<7), ferric iron hydroxide patches will form on the surface. These patches have been shown to be the predominant sites for electron exchange. Efforts were undertaken to suppress the electron transfer at these sites to inhibit pyrite oxidation. It has been shown that pyrite oxidation can be controlled by exposing the pyrite to phosphate under relatively high pH values (pH above 5.0). However, phosphate ceases to function as an inhibitor under lower pHs. The use of two-tail phospholipids instead of phosphate to inhibit the pyrite oxidation proved to be very effective under abiotic conditions. The purpose of the present study is to determine if the use of two-tail phospholipids can be extended to systems that have bacteria present. Batch experiments were conducted in which pyrite slurries were treated with two-tailed lipid either before or after exposure to bacteria. Iron release into the solution was used as a reaction progress variable and Atomic Force Microscopy was used to study the distribution of lipids and bacteria on the pyrite surface. AFM images showed that the formation of 7nm lipid bilayers contributes to the majority of lipid structures on pyrite surface. The bilayers render the pyrite surface hydrophobic and inhibit the reaction of water with the surface, which is known to be a critical reactant. AFM images also showed that phospholipids are capable of displacing a large fraction of bacteria attached to pyrite, reducing the oxidation rate of the mineral. However, addition of heterotrophic bacterial (Acidiphilum acidophilum) to the system resulted in the increase in pyrite oxidation rate again. Cross-linking of the 23:2 dyne phospholipids by exposing the lipid to UV light greatly enhanced the stability of the lipid in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria. UV pretreated lipid layers reduced pyrite oxidation in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria for up to 30 days.
dc.format.extent230 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectChemistry, Physical
dc.subjectAtomic Force Microscope
dc.subjectCross-linking
dc.subjectEpifluorescence Microscope
dc.subjectFerrozine Method
dc.subjectLipid
dc.subjectPyrite
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF PHOSPHOLIPID COATING ON THE INHIBITION OF PYRITE OXIDATION UNDER BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC CONDITIONS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBorguet, Eric
dc.contributor.committeememberNicholson, Allen W.
dc.contributor.committeememberSchoonen, Martin A. A.
dc.description.departmentChemistry
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1371
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T19:19:15Z


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