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dc.contributor.advisorKendall, Philip C.
dc.creatorFurr, Jami Michele
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T18:26:01Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T18:26:01Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.other864884991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1250
dc.description.abstractObjective: A sizable body of literature has now examined posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms in youth in the aftermath of disaster. Meta-analysis is the preferred tool with which to inform funding decisions, service delivery, and public policy. Method: The present meta-analysis quantitatively synthesized this literature (k=96 studies; Total N = 74,154), summarizing the magnitude of overall associations between disasters and youth PTS, and identifying child, disaster, and study method factors associated with variations in the magnitude of these associations. Results: Despite variability across studies, disasters had a significant effect on youth PTS symptoms, falling in the small-to-medium range of magnitude. Aspects related to pre-existing child characteristics, the disaster and the child’s disaster exposure, and study methodology are significantly associated with variations in the magnitude of disaster effects on youth PTS symptoms. Specifically, female gender, higher death toll, closer proximity, personal loss, and perceived threat and distress at the time of the event were each associated with increased post-disaster PTS in youth. Regarding methodological factors, studies conducted within the first year postdisaster, studies that used established PTS measures, and studies that relied on childreport data identified a significant effect on youth PTS, whereas studies conducted after the first year, studies relying on non-established measures, and studies relying on parentreport data did not. Conclusion: In the aftermath of disasters, governmental funding agencies and private foundations provide substantial resources for child services following disasters. The present meta-analytic findings can help to inform optimal allocation of these resources and targeted intervention efforts, as well as the development and refinement of new interventions for youth suffering in the aftermath of disasters.
dc.format.extent96 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectChildren
dc.subjectDisasters
dc.subjectMeta-analysis
dc.subjectPosttraumatic Stress
dc.subjectPtsd
dc.subjectYouth
dc.titleDisasters and Youth: A Meta-analytic Examination of Posttraumatic Stress
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDrabick, Deborah A. G.
dc.contributor.committeememberHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Ronald T.
dc.contributor.committeememberMarshall, Peter J.
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinraub, Marsha
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1232
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T18:26:01Z


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