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dc.contributor.advisorSolomon, Miriam
dc.creatorFleming, Eric Felton
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T18:25:56Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T18:25:56Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other864885985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1228
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I argue that creativity should be understood as a situated and distributed process. As I develop my approach to understanding creativity over the course of this dissertation, three core claims emerge: 1) that the creative powers of particular agents are constituted within the concrete circumstances (both social and material) in which they are situated, 2) that the creative process itself unfolds across networks of associating actors, and 3) that these networks of associating actors include nonhumans of diverse sorts as active participants in the creative process. Understanding the creative process in this way distinguishes my approach from the ways in which creativity has traditionally been understood, which I argue are marked by a deep Cartesianism. This Cartesianism manifests itself in the way that creativity is predominantly studied and conceived of as a cognitive process that occurs within the minds of individuals. Because creativity is seen to occur within the minds of individuals, and because these minds are seen to function autonomously of their context, there is a resulting lack of attention to how the creative process is shaped by and extended out into the material and social environment. Furthermore, because creativity is understood to be solely a manifestation of human agency and human intentions, the active role of nonhumans in the creative process has not been taking into account. Drawing upon literature within feminist epistemology, cognitive science, science and technology studies, disability theory, and situated action theory, I argue that to better understand creativity, we must consider the creative process as it occurs within particular social and material environments, as it is distributed across diverse networks of actors, and as it is shaped in essential ways by nonhuman actors. It is only by considering creativity in its context, out in the world and in the interactions between things, that we can get an adequate understanding of the creative process.
dc.format.extent217 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
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dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPhilosophy
dc.subjectActor-network Theory
dc.subjectCreativity
dc.subjectDistributed
dc.subjectSituated
dc.titleSituating Creativity: Developing a Non-Cartesian Approach to the Creative Process
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAlperson, Philip
dc.contributor.committeememberMargolis, Joseph
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvalho, John
dc.description.departmentPhilosophy
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1210
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T18:25:56Z


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