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dc.contributor.advisorShipley, Thomas F.
dc.creatorFitzhugh, Shannon Leigh
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T18:25:55Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T18:25:55Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885596
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1222
dc.description.abstractThe study reported here tests a model that includes several factors thought to contribute to the comprehension of static multimedia learning materials (i.e. background knowledge, working memory, attention to components as measured with eye movement measures). The model examines the effects of working memory capacity, domain specific (biology) and related domain (geoscience) background knowledge on the visual attention to static multimedia text, and their collective influence on reading comprehension. A similar model has been tested with a previous cohort of students, and has been found to have a good fit to the data (Fitzhugh, Cromley, Newcombe, Perez and Wills, 2010). The present study tests the efficacy of visual cues (signaling) on the comprehension of multimedia texts and the effects of signaling on the relationships between cognitive factors and visual attention. Analysis of Covariance indicated that signaling interacts with background knowledge. Signaling also changes the distribution of attention to varying components of the multimedia display. The path model shows that signaling alters the relationship between domain specific background knowledge (biology) and comprehension as well as that of related background knowledge (geoscience) on comprehension. The nature of the relationships indicates that the characteristics of the reading material influence the type of background knowledge that contributes to comprehension. Results are discussed in terms of their application to a classroom setting.
dc.format.extent147 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectBackground Knowledge
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectDiagram Comprehension
dc.subjectEye Tracking
dc.subjectPath Model
dc.titleThe Coherence Formation Model of Illustrated Text Comprehension: A Path Model of Attention to Multimedia Text
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberCromley, Jennifer
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcombe, Nora
dc.contributor.committeememberChein, Jason M.
dc.contributor.committeememberBooth, Julie L.
dc.contributor.committeememberDavey, Adam
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1204
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T18:25:55Z


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