• A Crisis of Identity: Advertising & the British Ministry of Information's Propaganda Posters of World War II

      Immerman, Richard H.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
    • A Very Catty Deep Dive: Facilitating Diversity in Video Games

      Guido, Abby (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      In this project, my intent is to show as much of the foundtation for this game as possible both in effort to share my research, and share my story with other interested parties. As such, while the contents to follow are complete from my self imposed standard in August of 2018, the true nature of this project is for it to grow, change, and evolve as I work and research more. As it stands now, I have been quietly working on A Very Catty Game for the better part of six years, beginning on a whim in my freshman year of high school. It has come a long way since then, and I expect that it will go a long way from now. This piece will serve as an important resource and a mark on the calendar to see just how far I will go in the future.
    • A Whole New World - Exploring Emotion in Music

      Brodsky, Rachel; Buddhiraju, Kirvani; Szmacinski, Ola; Calaku, Katie; Hobson, Sam; Brucato, Maria (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-05)
      When Disney movies open with a murmur of classi cal music, crescendoing into powerful waves, they immediately transport us to animated lands of princes and princesses, talking animals and evil stepmothers. Or if you haven’t watched a Disney movie in a while, what about the recent allure of the sea shanty? When listening to the now-famil iar rhythm of the folk songs that traditionally accompanied labo rious tasks while at sea, we imagine ourselves on a 19th century ship, helping to raise the sail or hoist up the anchor. How do we create entire worlds for ourselves, whether familiar or from cen turies before, based on the music we hear? Human perception of music is influenced by pitch, key, tempo and other factors, which evoke emotion by activating the limbic and paralimbic systems [1, 2]. That said, the whole story behind music is still being sounded out, and some current theories are explored below.
    • African-American Women's Basketball in the 1920s and 1930s: Active Participants in the 'New Negro' Movement

      Collier-Thomas, Bettye; Kusmer, Kenneth L. (Temple University. Libraries, 2010)
    • Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: Down the Rabbit Hole

      Ataher, Aleena (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-12)
      A young girl, age seven, wakes up one more morning to find her limbs have grown dramatically overnight. Her arm, once a mere ten inches, now extends fifteen feet from her body, while her hands have shrunk to a size similar to that of a blueberry. Her leg, once a comfortable few feet from her body, has narrowed to just centimeters in width. Amid her confusion, she recalls a situation similar to her own in a story she once read about a girl who follows a rabbit down a hole: Lewis Caroll’s popular children’s novel, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. British psychiatrist Dr. John Todd noticed this same resemblance during the 1950s when six of his adolescent patients came to him complaining of migraines and epileptic episodes, simultaneously reporting symptoms parallel to Alice’s experiences.
    • ALS: Diagnosis by Deduction

      Morgan, Gideon; Vajipayajula, Dhruv; Shah, Aarohi; McGrath, Rose; Swanchara, Melissa; Leonard, Brian; Leonard|0000-0002-4901-0977 (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-05)
    • Ambiguous Attacks on Democracy in Europe and the Americas: What can intergovernmental organizations do?

      Pollack, Mark; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2014)
      Past the time of traditional coups, today’s would-be dictators are seeking out more ambiguous ways to undercut democracy. These norm violations are often difficult to identify, and sometimes are conceived of as less threatening to outsiders. So, what can an intergovernmental organization do if its member states begin to violate common democratic norms in an ambiguous way? While some have claimed IGO action is determined by the violating state’s power or the pressure of third parties, few have explored the influence of an IGO’s structure and design on its decision to enforce norms. This paper explores some ambiguous measures being taken to undermine democracy, and seeks to disaggregate the complex process of IGO norm enforcement and subject the moving parts to initial scrutiny. In this paper, I assess the impact of five IGO characteristics on its decision to enforce democratic norms in member states: IGO composition or democratic density, democratic norm legalization, enforcement provisions, voting rules in the IGO’s intergovernmental branches, and delegation to the IGO’s supranational bodies. I develop six, independent hypotheses, relating one IGO characteristic to one aspect of the decision-making process. Using a pattern matching research design, I conduct a comparative case-study analysis of the Peruvian autogolpe facing the Organization of American States in 1992 and the Hungarian constitutional crisis challenging the European Union today to test each variable’s predicted effect.
    • An Examination in Social Engineering: The Susceptibility of Disclosing Private Security Information in College Students

      Rege, Aunshul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      While security technology can be nearly impenetrable, the people behind the computer screens are often easily manipulated, which makes the human factor the biggest threat to cybersecurity. This study examined whether college students disclosed private information about themselves, and what type of information they shared. The study utilized pretexting, in which attackers impersonate individuals in certain roles and often involves extensive research to ensure credibility. The goal of pretexting is to create situations where individuals feel safe releasing information that they otherwise might not. The pretexts used for this study were based on the natural inclination to help, where people tend to want to help those in need, and reciprocity, where people tend to return favors given to them. Participants (N=51) answered survey questions that they thought were for a good cause or that would result in a reward. This survey asked for increasingly sensitive information that could be used maliciously to gain access to identification, passwords, or security questions. Upon completing the survey, participants were debriefed on the true nature of the study and were interviewed about why they were willing to share information via the survey. Some of the most commonly skipped questions included “Student ID number” and “What is your mother’s maiden name?”. General themes identified from the interviews included the importance of similarities between the researcher and the subject, the researcher’s adherence to the character role, the subject’s awareness of question sensitivity, and the overall differences between online and offline disclosure. Findings suggest that college students are more likely to disclose private information if the attacker shares a similar trait with the target or if the attacker adheres to the character role they are impersonating. Additionally, this study sheds light on the research limitations, emphasizes the relevance of the human factor in security and privacy, and offers recommendations for future research.
    • As Boundaries Fade: The Social Contract in Cyberspace

      Taylor, Paul C. (Paul Christopher) (Temple University. Libraries, 2006)
      For over ten years, scholars have debated over law in cyberspace. Some, the "exceptiona!ists, " argue that cyberspace should develop its own system of laws and regulations. Others, the" unexceptionalists, " argue that real-space territorial law must govern the internet. This paper advocates a new kind of exceptionalism, grounded in an examination of legitimate authority in cyberspace. I use social contract theory to locate two sources of legitimate cyberspace authority: the authority of a real-space sovereign over its citizens and the authority of a cyberspace community formed by a distinct social contract. I argue that, because cyberspace dissolves territorial boundaries, internet users are insecure in their knowledge of political relationships and that cyberspace communities can resolve this incon venience.
    • Assessing the Cherry Pantry’s First Year of Operation and Planning for the Future

      Neuber, Amanda; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      This research examines how Temple University supports its food insecure students and what can be learned from other school’s support systems. This includes a broad survey of food security literature as well as a deeper review of how students experience the effects of food insecurity, and how the issue is further compounded depending on one’s gender or sexuality. An analysis of public data documenting food insecurity at Temple, in addition to interviews with Temple faculty and staff offer an insight into how well services like the Cherry Pantry are serving the student body. Identifying problems and successes is a crucial first step in improving student services, but this research then offers potential solutions for Temple by investigating what strategies have worked for other schools fighting food insecurity on their campuses. This research joins a growing body of literature that shows why food insecurity needs to be a major priority for all colleges and universities. A lack of access to affordable, nutritional food greatly affects the ability of students to live happy and successful lives and their ability to engage with their academic work.
    • Bach Transcribed for Oboe: History and Interpretation

      Zohn, Steven David, 1966- (Temple University. Libraries, 2022)
      Johann Sebastian Bach’s solo oboe music, though regarded today as a treasure, does not really exist as such. Instead, these pieces come down to us as harpsichord concertos (and in some cases church cantata movements) that have been later reconstructed for solo oboe. For example, Bach’s Concerto in C Minor for violin, oboe, and strings (BWV 1060R), was reconstructed from a work for two harpsichords and strings when nineteenth-century scholars realized the high probability of the solo parts originally having been conceived for oboe and violin (which are more soloistic instruments than the harpsichord). In this paper, I focus on performance approaches and styles to the first movement of BWV 1060R. After explaining how Bach’s solo oboe repertoire was derived from his keyboard concertos and church cantatas, I investigate the performance traditions of this movement from the mid-twentieth century to the present using a variety of recordings. This evaluation is based in part on my own experiences of playing oboe and listening to professional oboists. My goal is to clarify not only the history of J.S. Bach’s solo oboe repertoire, but also to reveal how the history of performing the opening Allegro of BWV 1060R on the oboe has unfolded, and how it is still developing today.
    • Before and After Photography: The Makeover Method to Discipline and Punish

      Swann, Paul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • Beloved, Beyoncé, and the Burdens Of Our Past: A Critical Examination of Healing From Trauma in the African American Gothic

      Newman, Steve, 1970- (Temple University. Libraries, 2022)
      Despite being created nearly thirty years apart, Beloved and Lemonade are remarkably similar historical projects: both texts critically engage with America’s legacy of systemic racism to explore how past injustices create present-day inequality, arguing that the racist institutions that slavery was founded on did not disappear with the Emancipation Proclamation but instead continue to dramatically affect the everyday lives of people of color decades and centuries later. Both Morrison and Beyoncé allegorize this argument in their respective texts: in Beloved, Sethe acts as a microcosm for Reconstruction-era Black Americans grappling with the omnipresent effects of slavery’s legacy less than two decades after the end of the Civil War; whereas in Lemonade, Beyoncé uses her personal experience coming to terms with her husband’s infidelity as a way to examine racism’s effect on the Black family throughout American history. In both cases, this allegory serves as each woman’s proposed guide for personal and national healing in a country haunted by its racist past and present, and in both texts, the essential question becomes how to create a more just future from the wreckage of an unjust past — how to move “forward,” as Beyoncé sings in Lemonade’s emotional peak. The critical difference, however, is in how each author’s historical project merges the past and present and the largely different conclusions they come to as a result. This paper will focus on these differences between Beloved and Lemonade’s engagement with the past as a vessel for understanding the present through a comparative analysis of these texts’ functions as projects for personal healing, literary storytelling, and historical reexamination. First, I will explore the texts’ unique differences in medium and structure, paying attention to how the merging of past and present becomes an essential part of the storytelling process for each author. Second, I will contextualize each text within the legacy of African American Gothic literature, focusing on how the texts’ interest in Gothic symbols and motifs — especially ghosts and haunting — further blend past and present in ways that dramatically impact each story. Third, I will examine how each author uses water and fire as competing symbols for different processes of healing, connecting each to the texts’ shared fascination with memory as a means of reintegrating the past into the present. Finally, I will demonstrate how the conclusions each author comes to about how to approach personal and national healing in the context of systemic racism lead to vastly different paths for establishing a more just future, and I will argue that Lemonade puts forth a much more definitive model for healing with the past than Beloved, which offers an inconclusive position that is more in line with the complexities that arise from this question.
    • Bioretention Systems Optimized for Denitrification: Stormwater Management Practice Design Recommendations for Philadelphia

      Keston, Geoff (Temple University. Libraries, 2022)
      This paper proposes bioretention design features for land developers in the Philadelphia area. For areas that experience intermittent storms that produce high volumes of runoff and high concentrations of metals and inorganic pollutants, the paper recommends constructing bioretention systems with dimensions following the Philadelphia Water Department’s bioretention sizing table. The basin media should consist of loam or sandy loam modified with a carbon-rich amendment, while the drainage layer media should consist of an amended gravel/woodchip mixture. Three exploratory, inexpensive amendments — waste tire crumb rubber, coconut coir fiber, and biochar — were evaluated to enhance the performance of the bioretention system; these carbon-based adsorbents have been proven to remove metals and inorganic nutrients from contaminated water. By pyrolyzing coconut coir fiber at around 300 deg C, biochar amendments to the soil and internal water storage layers could enhance a bioretention system’s capacity to adsorb metals while also improving microbial and plant mediated nutrient removal and water retention potential. The bioretention system is expected to meet the PWD’s requirements for metal and inorganic nutrient pollution removal even in excessive circumstances, thereby allowing the developer’s project to proceed as intended while protecting combined wastewater systems and the surrounding urban environment from excessive contaminated runoff.
    • Blond or Blonde? Frank Ocean and Identity Construction

      Goldin-Perschbacher, Shana (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
    • Brain in Harmony: The Role of Music in Rehabilitation of People with Multiple Sclerosis

      Gibson, Eve (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-12)
      Imagine you are running a marathon. You are on your last mile, struggling to keep a steady pace as your body starts to feel the exhaustion from a prolonged exertion of energy. You try your best to keep up with the person in front of you, but it is not enough. Instead, you choose to focus on the music playing on someone's speaker nearby. The strong beat influences you to synchronize with the music, matching each stride to the beat, creating a steady running pace. Focusing solely on the synchronization of your running to the music, a wave of energy fills your body and melts away the exhaustion you were feeling earlier. Before you know it, the last mile flies by and you cross the finish line, coming back to your body. This instinctive synchronization shows the impact of music on neurological and physical functioning. By uncovering the neurological mechanisms behind this synchronization process, clinicians can further explore possible treatment methods that utilize music to benefit individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Music-based interventions engage the whole brain which has the potential to facilitate neuroplastic changes and rehabilitation of people with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS) through rhythmic neural entrainment.
    • Brain-Machine Interface

      Lua, Esmeralda; McGuigan, Daniel; Rahaman, Arafat; Wanders, Siena; Neguch, Natalya; Bullock, Trent (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-05)
      Requiring collaboration in the fields of neurobiology, electrophysiology, engineering, computer science, and biomedicine, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) are an emerging multidisciplinary technology with countless potential benefits. The ability to record and interpret neuronal activity at a higher resolution and specificity is one of the exciting promises of BMIs. The applications of this technology provide hope for a vast number of individuals who suffer from a wide range of neurological diseases and disorders. It can also be applied to artificial prostheses, to provide limb sensation for amputees. Although BMIs hold immense potential, questions within the realm of neuroethics have raised concern. In particular, the possible exploitation that could arise through medical practices with the advancement of technology [1]. Where humans may potentially be given capabilities that surpass the norm, changing the perception of what it means to be human [1]. It is important to take into account that there are BMIs currently in place that have provided relief for various conditions. To name a few, the use of deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s, spinal cord stimulation for those with intractable pain, and the use of motor prosthesis for patients with epilepsy [1]. However, these methods oftentimes only provide temporary or mild relief and are not inerrant. The trajectory of the BMIs outlined herein aims toward finding an ideal invasive mechanism to solve these drawbacks of mild and temporary relief. There are a vast number of neurological disorders that continue to trouble humanity both emotionally and economically [1], that could substantially change through the use of BMIs.
    • Bridging the Gap Between the Science & People Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

      Sotelo, Angelica; Baffoe-Bonnie, Jude; Shah, Aarohi; Michel, Erin; Jozwik, Matthew; Cában Rivera, Carolina (Temple University. Grey Matters, 2021-05)
      Most Americans have probably seen media coverage of a National Football League (NFL) game. Because American football is a full contact sport, it is probably not surprising that frequent collisions between players result in concussions, or “mild” traumatic brain injury (TBI) [1]. While concussions have been associated with American football and its players since 1994, athletes are not the only people affected by them [2]. 69 million individuals sustain TBI each year worldwide [3]. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), while a concussion itself is not life-threatening, it is the after effects of the concussion that contribute to complications which may hinder a person’s quality of life for some time [1]. Recent research on the oculomotor system and neuro-optometric rehabilitation may offer affected individuals more opportunities for concussion recovery. Concussions affect our brain in a multitude of ways, including our physical, chemical, mental, and visual processes; however, neuro-optometric rehabilitation is a glimmer of hope for those recovering from traumatic brain injury.
    • Case Study on the use of Pedal in Bach’s Fugue no. 17 in Ab Major BVW 1

      Zohn, Steven David, 1966- (Temple University. Libraries, 2021)
      "Robert Schumann claims that “Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier should be a pianist’s bread and butter.” Whether the pianist is a young student, a teacher, or a performer, many musicians will agree with Schumann’s statement. Because so many play these pieces, there is much controversy on how to perform them, with not the least of the matters involving the use of the damper pedal or “finger pedal” on the modern piano. The damper pedal on a piano is controlled by the right foot, and finger pedaling is defined as keeping the fingers depressed in the keys for longer than written. Often, these two techniques are used in conjunction with each other to create a seamless legato and a thicker texture. Either way you decide to create legato and texture, there are two schools of thought: you should not use pedal because Bach did not include pedal indications (and it is additionally assumed these pieces were written for harpsichord, clavichord or organ), or you should use pedal and finger pedal to enhance what Bach has already written. So what do you do when you sit down to play a prelude or fugue from Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier? Do you plant your right foot firmly on the floor underneath the piano bench so as not to allow yourself to fiddle with the pedal? Do you let your instincts tell you where to add pedal? Do you look for others who have already explored this topic? The bottom line is that these decisions should ultimately be up to the performer, though it is important to note that they should always be musically informed. Recordings can give performers an idea of when to let the right foot sneak onto the pedal and when to keep the music “dry.” There are many places to use pedal in Bach’s Fugue no. 17 in Ab Major from book 1 of the WTC, thus it is highly informative to see which musicians (specifically from 1965 to 2000, as this is the date range of the recordings) decide when to use or when not use the damper pedal or finger pedaling to help the music along."