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dc.contributor.advisorOrvell, Miles
dc.creatorEmery, Jacqueline
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T18:25:44Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T18:25:44Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885247
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1169
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation seeks to expand our conception of what constitutes Native American letters by examining how the periodical became a prominent form in Native American literary production in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With its focus on the boarding school, Writing against Erasure provides insight into the context in which students first learned how to make complex and sophisticated choices in print. Within the contested disciplinary space of the boarding school, the periodical press functioned as a site for competing discourses on assimilation. Whereas school authorities used the white-run school newspapers to publicize their programs of cultural erasure, students used the student-run school newspapers to defend and preserve Native American identity and culture in the face of the assimilationist imperatives of the boarding schools and the dominant culture. Writing against Erasure highlights the formative impact of students' experiences with the boarding school press on the periodical practices and rhetorical strategies of two well-known Native American literary figures, Zitkala-Sa and Charles Eastman. By treating the periodical writings of these two prominent boarding school graduates alongside the periodical writings produced by boarding school students while they were still at school, Writing against Erasure provides a literary genealogy that reveals important continuities between these writers' strategic and political uses of the periodical press. Writing against Erasure argues that Native American boarding school students and graduates used the periodical press not to promote the interests of school authorities as some scholars have argued, but rather to preserve their cultural traditions, to speak out on behalf of indigenous interests, and to form a pan-Indian community at the turn of the twentieth century.
dc.format.extent218 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectLiterature, American
dc.subjectAmerican Studies
dc.subjectNative American Studies
dc.titleWriting against Erasure: Native American Boarding School Students and the Periodical Press, 1880-1920
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Sue-Im
dc.contributor.committeememberSalazar, James B.
dc.contributor.committeememberPowell, Timothy B.
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1151
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T18:25:44Z


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