• A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF THE STRATEGIES DUAL LANGUAGE TEACHERS EMPLOY TO DIFFERENTIATE READING INSTRUCTION IN THEIR CLASSROOMS

      Brooks, Wanda M., 1969-; Wasik, Barbara A.; Hindman, Annemarie H.; Neugebauer, Sabina Rak (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      Two-way dual language programs are a form of enrichment or additive bilingual education “that target(s) students from two language backgrounds (e.g., Spanish and English) who study the content-areas through both languages in integrated classrooms” (R. Freeman, 2007, p. 5). These programs have been growing rapidly over the last few years (O. Garcia, 2010; Hamman, 2017; Wilson, 2011). A number of scholars have agreed that well-implemented programs of the model are more effective in helping English learners (EL) reach grade-level proficiency in reading by the end of eighth grade than other forms of education (Thomas & Collier, 2012). While there is a growing consensus in the field on the long-term benefits of this type of school for ELs, there is a need for further qualitative research focusing on the pedagogy and curriculum dual language teachers employ to successfully teach reading to their student body. Differentiation, which is an increasingly popular instructional approach (Smit & Humpert, 2012), is a critical piece to teaching reading to a diverse group of students, as is the case in dual language schools. Situated a dual language school in a large urban area on the East Coast, this 5-month qualitative case study aimed to understand how and why four teachers differentiate reading instruction in both Spanish and English through the use of participant observation, teacher interviews, and artifact collection. Findings show that in addition to creating a supportive environment, teachers utilized tools like technology, visuals, translanguaging, and support from paraprofessionals to differentiate reading instruction for language learners. Additionally, while the findings demonstrate many similarities across instruction in both languages, they also reveal a disparity of resources. Lastly, the findings show teachers’ decisions are largely influenced by factors such as their students’ funds of knowledge, their own funds of knowledge, Cummins’ (1979) theory of interdependence, time, technology, and school district requirements.