• THE PRESSURE TO BE PERFECT: A PATH ANALYSIS INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF INSTITUTIONAL RESOURCES ON SELF-ESTEEM AND ENGAGEMENT OF ASIAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

      Jordan, Will J.; Goyette, Kimberly A.; Hindman, Annemarie H.; Davis, James Earl, 1960-; Caldwell, Corrinne A. (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
      This study researches the involvement and engagement of Asian college students in the United States. Utilizing Astin's Theory of Student Involvement, Tinto's Interactionalist Theory, and the Model Minority Stereotype as its theoretical foundation, this study examines if colleges and universities are truly engaging its Asian student populations through the variables of mentorship relationships, involvement inside and outside of the classroom, and leadership opportunities. The study takes the additional step of examining intra-group variability among Asian students, in an effort to determine if different ethnic group memberships and generation/citizenship status play a role in the experience of Asian college students. Using data from the 2009 Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership Survey, the study utilizes path analysis to build a path model linking the aforementioned variables with self-esteem and self-confidence.