• BLACK GIRL MAGIC: EXPLORING AND UNDERSTANDING THE ACADEMIC AND ATHLETIC EXPERIENCES OF BLACK FEMALE STUDENT ATHLETES AT PREDOMINANTLY WHITE DIVISION I UNIVERSITIES

      Davis, James Earl, 1960-; Hall, John; Schifter, Catherine; Green, Tina Sloan (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      This qualitative research explored the unique experiences of Black female student athletes. Specifically, Black female student athletes at Division I (D-I), Predominantly White Institutions, academic and athletic experiences were explored as factors that may contribute to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) graduation success rate (GSR). Participants for this study included Black female student athletes from different Division I schools on the east coast. Accounts of the findings include the collection, data analysis, and interpretations drawing from the lens of Black Feminist theory, Intersectionality, and Sensemaking. The findings indicate specifically that Black female student athletes do not have unique experiences in regards to academics and athletics. The themes that emerged from academics and athletes include: transitional experiences, life and career goals, relationships with teammates and coaches, and pressure to perform. These themes are all related to the first research question. In terms of race and gender, the findings reveal that Black female student athletes struggle with racial reality, support system, self-segregation, and gender bias. During the interview process, the participants added more in-depth responses to the research question regarding race and gender differences. Many gave examples of when they faced racial or gender discrimination. It is important to note that one of the participants is an international student. I included her international race perspective in the findings section too as her viewpoint can be seen as an outlier. This study’s findings and implications have the potential to support and inspire Black female student athletes, inform higher education institutions and athletic programs, and the ways in which the graduation rate gap may be reduced and/or eliminated.