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dc.contributor.advisorUrwin, Gregory J. W., 1955-
dc.creatorDauphinee, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:27:17Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:27:17Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885337
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1055
dc.description.abstractMany historians of the American Revolution fail to accurately assess the impact British supporters in the Thirteen Colonies had on the military dimension of the war. The Crown's American allies, commonly referred to as Loyalists, were instrumental in British operations throughout the conflict, especially in the southern colonies. Reports from the royal governors of the southern colonies numbered the Loyalists in the thousands. British officials in London developed a plan to Americanize the war by utilizing Loyalists more comprehensively, lessening the burden for more British troops. The first steps toward Americanizing the war occurred when General Sir Henry Clinton and Lieutenant General Charles, Second Earl, Cornwallis incorporated southern Loyalists with their British troops to reconquer the southern colonies in 1780. After the British conquest of Charleston, South Carolina in June 1780, Lieutenant General Cornwallis was awarded the independent command of the British forces in the South and was additionally charged with rallying and protecting the Loyalists in North and South Carolina. Cornwallis consistently tried to organize the Loyalists into militia corps to combat Rebel partisans operating in the Carolina backcountry, The constant failure of the Loyalist militia persuaded Cornwallis of their inability to sustain themselves. As a result, Cornwallis abandoned the southern colonies, as well as the Crown's loyal subjects, in favor of offensive operations in Virginia. His aim was to prevent the Rebel southern army from receiving supplies and recruits. Many slaves joined Cornwallis' army in Virginia and persuaded him to utilize them to replace the services provided by southern white Loyalists. These failed decisions contributed to Cornwallis' humiliating defeat at Yorktown in October 1781, effectively ending the military dimension of the American Revolution.
dc.format.extent86 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHistory, Military
dc.subjectAmerican History
dc.subjectAmerican Revolution
dc.subjectLord Charles Cornwallis
dc.subjectLoyalists
dc.subjectSouthern Colonies
dc.titleLORD CHARLES CORNWALLIS AND THE LOYALISTS: A STUDY IN BRITISH PACIFICATION DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1775-1781
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGlasson, Travis
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/1037
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:27:17Z


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