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dc.contributor.advisorGould, Thomas John, 1966-
dc.contributor.advisorParikh, Vinay
dc.creatorConnor, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:27:09Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:27:09Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.other965642465
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/1004
dc.description.abstractOrganisms can form safety associations with cues that predict the absence of an aversive event. This cognitive process, learned safety, is important for modulating emotional processing, as safety cues can decrease fear in the presence of previously learned danger cues. Further, there are clinical implications in understanding learned safety, as individuals with PTSD present with deficits in learned safety. Additionally, there is a well established relationship between smoking and PTSD. The link between smoking and PTSD is unclear, however one possibility is that nicotine-associated changes in cognition could facilitate PTSD symptoms, particularly by disrupting are altering learned safety. Considering that nicotine has been shown to modulate associative learning, including hippocampus-dependent forms of fear learning, we hypothesized that nicotine administration could cause maladaptive associative learning to occur, leading to altered safety learning. In the present study, mice were administered acute nicotine and trained and tested in two forms of cued safety learning, explicitly unpaired and backwards trace conditioning. To test for conditioned inhibition of fear by safety cues we performed summation testing. Summation testing indicated that acute nicotine did not impact unpaired learned safety, but did disrupt backwards trace conditioned safety. Additionally, chronic nicotine was found to have no effect on backwards trace conditioned safety, suggesting the development of tolerance. Importantly, on a separate test in which the backwards trace conditioned stimulus was presented alone in a novel context, acute nicotine administration was found to facilitate a fear association with the backwards trace conditioned stimulus. Therefore, acute nicotine prevented backwards trace conditioned safety, by facilitating the formation of a maladaptive fear association. Finally, we found that infusion of nicotine into the dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex resulted in similar maladaptive behavioral patterns in summation testing. These findings are discussed with respect to how nicotine can alter cognition and the role alterations in cognition may play PTSD.
dc.format.extent101 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectPharmacology
dc.subjectConditioned Inhibition
dc.subjectHippocampus
dc.subjectLearned Safety
dc.subjectMpfc
dc.subjectNicotine
dc.subjectTrace Conditioning
dc.titleACUTE NICOTINE-DEPENDENT ALTERATIONS IN ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING INTERFERE WITH BACKWARDS TRACE CONDITIONED SAFETY
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberBangasser, Debra A.
dc.contributor.committeememberWeisberg, Robert W.
dc.contributor.committeememberChein, Jason M.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael S.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/986
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:27:09Z


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