• Design and Usability of a System for the Study of Head Orientation

      Darvish, Kurosh; Wright, William Geoffrey; Keshner, Emily Anne (Temple University. Libraries, 2010)
      The ability to control head orientation relative to the body is a multi-sensory process that mainly depends on three sensory pathways namely, proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual. A system to study the sensory integration of head orientation was developed and tested. A test seat with five-point harness was assembled to provide the passive postural support. A light-weight head-mount display (HMD) was designed for mounting multi-axis accelerometers and a mini- CCD camera to provide the visual input to virtual reality (VR) goggles with 39° horizontal field of view. A digitally generated sinusoidal signal was delivered to a motor-driven computer-controlled sled on a 6m linear railing system. A data acquisition system was designed to collect acceleration data. A pilot study was conducted to test the system. Four young healthy subjects were seated with their trunks fixed to the seat. Subjects received a sinusoidal anterior-posterior translation with peak acceleration of 0.06g at 0.1Hz and 0.12g at 0.2Hz, 0.5Hz and 1.1Hz. Four sets of visual conditions were randomly presented along with the translation. These conditions included eyes open looking forward, backward, and sideways, and also eyes closed. Linear acceleration data were collected from linear accelerometers placed on the head, trunk and seat and were processed using Matlab. The head motion was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to derive gain and phase of head pitch acceleration relative to seat linear acceleration. A randomization test for two independent variables was used to test significance of visual and inertial effects on response gain and phase shifts. Results show that the gain was close to one with no significant difference among visual conditions across frequencies. The phase was shown to be dependent on the head strategy each subject used. The ability to control head orientation relative to the body is a multi-sensory process that mainly depends on three sensory pathways namely, proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual. A system to study the sensory integration of head orientation was developed and tested. A test seat with five-point harness was assembled to provide the passive postural support. A light-weight head-mount display (HMD) was designed for mounting multi-axis accelerometers and a mini- CCD camera to provide the visual input to virtual reality (VR) goggles with 39° horizontal field of view. A digitally generated sinusoidal signal was delivered to a motor-driven computer-controlled sled on a 6m linear railing system. A data acquisition system was designed to collect acceleration data. A pilot study was conducted to test the system. Four young healthy subjects were seated with their trunks fixed to the seat. Subjects received a sinusoidal anterior-posterior translation with peak acceleration of 0.06g at 0.1Hz and 0.12g at 0.2Hz, 0.5Hz and 1.1Hz. Four sets of visual conditions were randomly presented along with the translation. These conditions included eyes open looking forward, backward, and sideways, and also eyes closed. Linear acceleration data were collected from linear accelerometers placed on the head, trunk and seat and were processed using Matlab. The head motion was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to derive gain and phase of head pitch acceleration relative to seat linear acceleration. A randomization test for two independent variables was used to test significance of visual and inertial effects on response gain and phase shifts. Results show that the gain was close to one with no significant difference among visual conditions across frequencies. The phase was shown to be dependent on the head strategy each subject used.
    • Virtual Reality and Higher Education: Presence and Motivation to Learn Via Immersive Media Experiences

      Lombard, Matthew; Lombard, Matthew; Morris, Nancy, 1953-; Liao, Tony; Han, Insook (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      Although many studies have pointed out the limitations of applying more advanced technology in educational settings (Collins & Halverson, 2018; Fedorov & Levitskaya, 2015; Kozma, 1994), some studies have shown media technology enhances essential educational outcomes (Gardner, 1993; Hew & Cheung, 2010; Jensen & Konradsen, 2018; McLellan, 1994; Merchant, Goetz, Cifuentes, Keeney-Kennicutt, & Davis, 2014) and that more immersive media technology can help people to perceive events through media technology better (Bracken & Lombard, 2004; Lombard, Biocca, Freeman, IJsselsteijn, & Schaevitz, 2015; Lombard, Ditton, Grabe, & Reich, 1997; Lombard, Lee, Sun, Xu, & Yang, 2017; Lombard, Reich, Grabe, Bracken, & Ditton, 2000). These current debates lead to a question of whether providing immersive experiences can help to achieve higher goals of education and what is the psychological processes behind it. The main purpose of this dissertation is to help people exploring these debates by providing more understanding of the psychological processes behind the motivation to learn in higher education when students have more immersive media experiences. Therefore, the role of presence and information processing in HMD VR (Head Mount Display Virtual Reality) on motivation to learn were tested and analyzed with a mixed-method study incorporating a lab experiment and in-depth interviews. Theoretic backgrounds and assumptions of Risk Information Seeking Processing (Kahlor, 2007; Stern & Fineberg, 1996) and Social Cognitive Theory (Ambrose, Bridges, DiPietro, Lovett, & Norman, 2010; Bandura, 1982) were deployed in the study design to see whether and how HMD VR can help transformative learning (Dewey, 1938; Mezirow, 1997; Middleton, 2014; Provident et al., 2015; Stipek, 2002; Taylor, 2007). Results revealed HMD VR increased students’ Motivation To Learn significantly. The increased level of Motivation To Learn in the HMD condition was also observed in the in-depth interviews. The results support these studies that suggested the association between interactive experiences and enhanced learning outcomes (Ang & Rao, 2008; Hew & Cheung, 2010; Kaufmann, Schmalstieg, & Wagner, 2000; Martín-Gutiérrez, Mora, Añorbe-Díaz, & González-Marrero, 2017; Moreno, Mayer, Spires, & Lester, 2001; Steinberg, 2000). The results also support the effectiveness of creating more immersive learning environments under the Social Cognitive Theory framework (Bandura, 1977; Miltiadou & Savenye, 2003; Rotter, 1990) but with limited support under the Risk Information Seeking and Processing framework (Kahlor, 2007; Stern & Fineberg, 1996). These results demonstrated the relationships between presence and MTL identifying how cultural experiences trigger social responses when people make associations in their higher-order cognitive processes, suggesting para-reality interaction. In addition to the theoretic contribution, the implications of this study provide helpful suggestions and insights to create and use HMD VR content to create transformative learning experiences for students.